antisocial

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antisocial

 [an″te-, an″ti-so´shal]
1. denoting behavior that violates the rights of others, societal mores, or the law.
2. denoting the specific personality traits seen in antisocial personality disorder.
antisocial personality disorder a personality disorder characterized by a conspicuous disregard for the rights and needs of others. Antisocial behavior begins before the age of 15 and includes such behaviors as truancy, delinquency, theft, and vandalism. Adults with this disorder show a lack of maturity, unwillingness to take responsibility, and emotional instability. The chief characteristic of such persons is an apparent lack of conscience. Their behavior includes a variety of antisocial and criminal acts, such as theft, engaging in an illegal occupation (for example, selling drugs), repeated defaulting on debts, sexual promiscuity, and repeated lying. In addition, an antisocial personality is often impulsive and aggressive and is unable to maintain consistent, responsible functioning at work, at school, or as a parent. Substance abuse is common.

As in other personality disorders, individuals with antisocial personality disorders refuse to admit to any problems. A patient who is a criminal may honestly believe that anyone who is not a criminal is merely stupid. Those with antisocial personalities often seem to be unable to learn from experience. They also are seldom willing to accept psychiatric help and when they do agree to consult a mental health professional, it is often only to avoid the legal consequences of their activity.

an·ti·so·cial

(an'tē-sō'shŭl),
Manifesting at least some of the traits of an antisocial personality disorder; disregard for social or legal norms, lying, aggressiveness, indifference to others' rights or safety, irresponsibility, blaming others, and showing minimal or no remorse. See: antisocial personality, antisocial personality disorder. Compare: asocial.

antisocial

/an·ti·so·cial/ (-so´sh'l)
1. denoting behavior that violates the rights of others, societal mores, or the law.
2. denoting the specific personality traits seen in antisocial personality disorder.

antisocial

(ăn′tē-sō′shəl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
1. Shunning the society of others; not sociable.
2. Hostile to or disruptive of the established social order; marked by or engaging in behavior that violates accepted mores: gangs engaging in vandalism and other antisocial behavior.

an′ti·so′cial·ly adv.

an·ti·so·cial

(an'tē-sō'shăl)
Opposed to the rights of people or to the legal norms of society.
Compare: asocial
References in periodicals archive ?
Whilst stimulants generally can be used for performance enhancement (20), two particular stimulants, cocaine and 'ecstasy', are misused antisocially by the general population and also by Athletes (21).
Conversely, failure to see the moral significance of social events may hinder the activation of moral cognition processes could inhibit temptations or impulses to act antisocially (Barriga et al.
The council said she had continued behaving antisocially despite having been warned by their night time noise team on a number of occasions.
propensity to respond antisocially and to try to shock.
The answer is "no" - but it's worth bearing in mind if you think there's any danger of you or your family or friends behaving unlawfully or antisocially.
Other external benefits of libraries might be that they promote a common understanding and therefore a more tolerant society, that they enable people to be more in control of their lives, with the consequence that they are less likely to behave antisocially, and that by making information widely available, libraries help safeguard democracy and promote active citizenship.
He willingly makes of himself a focal point demanding interpretation as either a sexually active male linked antisocially to lesbianism and prostitution, or as a sexually inactive male linked only superficially to any woman.
The kinds of risks that human adolescents take not only include behaving recklessly, acting up in school, and behaving antisocially (e.
When social workers judge that an antisocially behaving adolescent has a mental disorder, what are the implications of that attribution for other clinical judgments about the youth?
When an offender has been successfully "treated," essentially he or she has changed from acting antisocially to acting pro-socially.
would be discouraged"), leading to the view that absent legally imposed restraints, managers really are entrenched and free to act selfishly and antisocially, cf.