antisocial

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antisocial

 [an″te-, an″ti-so´shal]
1. denoting behavior that violates the rights of others, societal mores, or the law.
2. denoting the specific personality traits seen in antisocial personality disorder.
antisocial personality disorder a personality disorder characterized by a conspicuous disregard for the rights and needs of others. Antisocial behavior begins before the age of 15 and includes such behaviors as truancy, delinquency, theft, and vandalism. Adults with this disorder show a lack of maturity, unwillingness to take responsibility, and emotional instability. The chief characteristic of such persons is an apparent lack of conscience. Their behavior includes a variety of antisocial and criminal acts, such as theft, engaging in an illegal occupation (for example, selling drugs), repeated defaulting on debts, sexual promiscuity, and repeated lying. In addition, an antisocial personality is often impulsive and aggressive and is unable to maintain consistent, responsible functioning at work, at school, or as a parent. Substance abuse is common.

As in other personality disorders, individuals with antisocial personality disorders refuse to admit to any problems. A patient who is a criminal may honestly believe that anyone who is not a criminal is merely stupid. Those with antisocial personalities often seem to be unable to learn from experience. They also are seldom willing to accept psychiatric help and when they do agree to consult a mental health professional, it is often only to avoid the legal consequences of their activity.

an·ti·so·cial

(an'tē-sō'shŭl),
Manifesting at least some of the traits of an antisocial personality disorder; disregard for social or legal norms, lying, aggressiveness, indifference to others' rights or safety, irresponsibility, blaming others, and showing minimal or no remorse. See: antisocial personality, antisocial personality disorder. Compare: asocial.

antisocial

/an·ti·so·cial/ (-so´sh'l)
1. denoting behavior that violates the rights of others, societal mores, or the law.
2. denoting the specific personality traits seen in antisocial personality disorder.

antisocial

(ăn′tē-sō′shəl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
1. Shunning the society of others; not sociable.
2. Hostile to or disruptive of the established social order; marked by or engaging in behavior that violates accepted mores: gangs engaging in vandalism and other antisocial behavior.

an′ti·so′cial·ly adv.

an·ti·so·cial

(an'tē-sō'shăl)
Opposed to the rights of people or to the legal norms of society.
Compare: asocial
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, the "joke" is that the male-bonding of war, of bullfighting, of living the expatriate sporting life, leads Jake Barnes and others to come "home that way" the way of the dancers--but without the bravery to act antisocially.
The kinds of risks that human adolescents take not only include behaving recklessly, acting up in school, and behaving antisocially (e.
When social workers judge that an antisocially behaving adolescent has a mental disorder, what are the implications of that attribution for other clinical judgments about the youth?
When an offender has been successfully "treated," essentially he or she has changed from acting antisocially to acting pro-socially.
It is so unusual for girls to act aggressively or antisocially that bad genes must be at work.
The adolescent perpetrator must assume responsibility for his own behavior (Kahn & Lafond, 1988) and its consequences and understand that he has consciously chosen to act antisocially, regardless of any negative background elements (i.
Police previously released a CCTV image of four teenagers - said to have been acting antisocially - in the quadricycle in a bid to locate them.
Neighbourhood officers in the ward have received reports that people are using off-road bikes antisocially.
If we presume that the dispersal order on 16 year-olds in Bangor City centre was deemed to be necessary because they were actually there regularly and behaving antisocially, then how come Councillor Pickavance is asking for the order against that particularly age group to be lifted because they are not there now.
Leimgruber explains, "Although the frequency with which children acted antisocially is striking, the conditions under which they chose to act generously are even more interesting and suggest that children likely use much more sophisticated prosocial strategies than we previously assumed.
We remain focused on arresting criminals and putting them in court and that includes dealing with people who behave antisocially in our communities.
Officers attended and spoke to the driver, who admitted driving antisocially, and he was given a warning.