antisocial personality disorder


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antisocial

 [an″te-, an″ti-so´shal]
1. denoting behavior that violates the rights of others, societal mores, or the law.
2. denoting the specific personality traits seen in antisocial personality disorder.
antisocial personality disorder a personality disorder characterized by a conspicuous disregard for the rights and needs of others. Antisocial behavior begins before the age of 15 and includes such behaviors as truancy, delinquency, theft, and vandalism. Adults with this disorder show a lack of maturity, unwillingness to take responsibility, and emotional instability. The chief characteristic of such persons is an apparent lack of conscience. Their behavior includes a variety of antisocial and criminal acts, such as theft, engaging in an illegal occupation (for example, selling drugs), repeated defaulting on debts, sexual promiscuity, and repeated lying. In addition, an antisocial personality is often impulsive and aggressive and is unable to maintain consistent, responsible functioning at work, at school, or as a parent. Substance abuse is common.

As in other personality disorders, individuals with antisocial personality disorders refuse to admit to any problems. A patient who is a criminal may honestly believe that anyone who is not a criminal is merely stupid. Those with antisocial personalities often seem to be unable to learn from experience. They also are seldom willing to accept psychiatric help and when they do agree to consult a mental health professional, it is often only to avoid the legal consequences of their activity.

an·ti·so·cial per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

1. an enduring and pervasive pattern characterized by continuous and chronic antisocial behavior with disregard for and violation of the rights and safety of others, beginning before the age of 15; early childhood signs include chronic lying, stealing, fighting, and truancy; in adolescence there may be unusually early or aggressive sexual behavior, excessive drinking, and use of illicit drugs, such behavior continuing in adulthood.
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.

antisocial personality disorder

n.
A personality disorder characterized by chronic antisocial behavior and violation of the law and the rights of others.

antisocial personality disorder

a condition characterized by repetitive behavioral patterns that are contrary to usual moral and ethical standards and cause a person to experience continuous conflict with society. Symptoms include aggression, callousness, impulsiveness, irresponsibility, hostility, a low frustration level, marked emotional immaturity, and poor judgment. A person who has this disorder overlooks the rights of others, is incapable of loyalty to others or to social values, is unable to experience guilt or to learn from past behaviors, is impervious to punishment, and tends to rationalize his or her behavior or to blame it on others. Also called antisocial reaction.

antisocial personality disorder

Dyssocial personality disorder, psychopathy, sociopathy Psychiatry A disorder affecting an individual with complete disregard for the rights of others, who engages in antisocial behavior without remorse; APD begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood Prevalence 3% ♀; 1% ♂; more common with substance abuse or in prison, or forensic settings. See Conduct disorder, Personality disorder.
Antisocial personality disorder
  1. Pervasive pattern of disregard for & violation of rights of others occurring from age 15, indicated by 3 + of following
    1. Failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors that is grounds for arrest
    2. Deceitfulness as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, manipulating others for personal profit or pleasure
    3. Impulsivity or failure to plan ahead
    4. Irritability & aggressiveness, indicated by repeated physical assault
    5. Reckless disregard for safety of self or others
    6. Consistent irresponsibility, indicated by inconsistent work behavior or not honoring financial commitments
    7. Lack of remorse, indicated by indifference to, or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another
  2. Age ≥ 18
  3. Evidence of a conduct disorder–see there–before age 15
  4. .
  5. APD-defining behavior doesn't occur exclusively during course of schizophrenia or manic episode
.

an·ti·so·cial per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

(an'tē-sō'shăl pĕr-sŏn-al'i-tē dis-ōr'dĕr)
Mental state characterized by a history of continuous and chronic antisocial behavior with disregard for and violation of the rights of others, beginning before the age of 15 years; early childhood signs include chronic lying, stealing, fighting, and truancy; in adolescence there may be unusually early or aggressive sexual behavior, excessive drinking, and use of illicit drugs. Such behavior continues to adulthood.

antisocial personality disorder

A condition of defective capacity for affection or for feeling for others. Affected people are conscienceless and seemingly unaware of the destructive effects of their behaviour on others. They cannot form satisfactory relationships in marriage or at work and often manifest uncontrolled aggression. Stealing, gambling, drug-taking, alcoholism, fire-raising and assault are common features. Such people do not respond to punishment and are a source of much trouble to society. It is questionable whether there is any effective treatment, but see THERAPEUTIC COMMUNITY.
References in periodicals archive ?
The common characteristic of the false positive cases was the absence of antisocial personality disorder in any of them.
The most recent edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) states that the "essential feature of antisocial personality disorder is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood.
Therefore, the null hypothesis of no difference between an executive function of the brain, people with antisocial personality disorder and no personality disorder is rejected.
Gender differences in manifestations of antisocial personality disorder among residential drug abuse treatment clients.
But those diagnosed with substance abuse and those with antisocial personality disorder differ in at least four important ways:
76) In short, these initiatives made individuals with severe antisocial personality disorder a priority population for intensive mental health interventions.
However, the efficacy of some cognitive-behavioral interventions in the treatment of antisocial personality disorder may be extrapolated from studies focusing on the treatment of such populations as drug offenders, convicts, and juvenile delinquents.
I diagnoses of current depression and/or antisocial personality disorder are included as covariates in the multivariate analyses.
To more clearly determine the ability of history and type of personality disorder to predict the clinical course of alcohol relapse as it relates to stress, a large, multicenter, prospective study enrolled 573 patients with schizotypal personality disorder (STPD), borderline personality disorder (BPD), antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), or obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD), and followed them for 6 years.
Six cases of patients with mental retardation who have antisocial personality disorder.
Paul Sloan QC, defending, said Summers had developed a deep-rooted antisocial personality disorder after being bullied at school where he was a slow learner.
While modern psychiatry relates antisocial personality disorder APD to sociopathy (not to be confused with psychosis), according to the DSM-IV only 3% men and 1% of women are diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder.