surgery

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surgery

 [sur´jer-e]
1. the branch of health science that treats diseases, injuries, and deformities by manual or operative methods.
2. the place where operative procedures are performed.
3. in Great Britain, a room or office where a doctor sees and treats patients.
4. the work performed by a surgeon; see also operation and procedure. adj., adj sur´gical.
ambulatory surgery any operative procedure not requiring an overnight stay in the hospital; it must be carefully planned to ensure that all necessary diagnostic tests are completed prior to admission. Discharge instructions must place a high priority on patient safety. Called also day surgery.
bench surgery surgery performed on an organ that has been removed from the body, after which it is reimplanted.
day surgery ambulatory surgery.
maxillofacial surgery oral and maxillofacial s.
minimal access surgery (minimally invasive surgery) a surgical procedure done in a manner that causes little or no trauma or injury to the patient, such as through a cannula using lasers, endoscopes, or laparoscopes; compared with other procedures, those in this category involve less bleeding, smaller amounts of anesthesia, less pain, and minimal scarring.
open heart surgery surgery that involves incision into one or more chambers of the heart, such as for repair or palliation of congenital heart defects, repair or replacement of defective heart valves, or coronary artery bypass.
oral and maxillofacial surgery that branch of dental practice that deals with the diagnosis and the surgical and adjunctive treatment of diseases, injuries, and defects of the human mouth and dental structures. Called also maxillofacial or oral surgery.
orthopedic surgery orthopedics.
plastic surgery see plastic surgery.
stereotaxic surgery the production of sharply localized lesions in the brain after precise localization of the target tissue by use of three-dimensional coordinates.

sur·ger·y

(sŭr'jĕr-ē),
1. The branch of medicine concerned with the treatment of disease, injury, and deformity by physical operation or manipulation.
2. The performance or procedures of an operation.
[L. chirurgia; G. cheir, hand, + ergon, work]

surgery

/sur·gery/ (ser´jer-e)
1. the branch of medicine that treats diseases, injuries, and deformities by manual or operative methods.
2. the place in a hospital, or doctor's or dentist's office, where surgery is performed.
3. in Great Britain, a room or office where a doctor sees and treats patients.
4. the work performed by a surgeon.

antiseptic surgery  surgery using antiseptic methods.
aseptic surgery  that performed in an environment so free from microorganisms that significant infection or suppuration does not supervene.
bench surgery  surgery performed on an organ that has been removed from the body, after which it is reimplanted.
conservative surgery  surgery designed to preserve, or to remove with minimal risk, diseased or injured organs, tissues, or limbs.
cytoreductive surgery  debulking.
dental surgery  oral and maxillofacial s.
general surgery  that which deals with surgical problems of all kinds, rather than those in a restricted area, as in a surgical specialty such as neurosurgery.
major surgery  surgery involving the more important, difficult, and hazardous operations.
minimally invasive surgery  surgery done with only a small incision or no incision at all, such as through a cannula with a laparoscope or endoscope.
minor surgery  surgery restricted to management of minor problems and injuries.
Mohs' surgery  see under technique.
oral and maxillofacial surgery  the branch of dentistry that deals with the diagnosis and surgical and adjunct treatment of diseases and defects of the mouth and dental structures.
plastic surgery  surgery concerned with restoration, reconstruction, correction, or improvement in shape and appearance of body structures that are defective, damaged, or misshapen by injury, disease, or growth and development.
radical surgery  surgery designed to extirpate all areas of locally extensive disease and adjacent zones of lymphatic drainage.
stereotactic surgery , stereotaxic surgery any of several techniques for the production of sharply circumscribed lesions in specific tiny areas of pathologic tissue in deep-seated brain structures after locating the discrete structure by means of three-dimensional coordinates.

surgery

(sûr′jə-rē)
n. pl. surger·ies
1. The branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of injury, deformity, and disease by the use of instruments.
2.
a. Treatment based on such medicine, typically involving the removal or replacement of diseased tissue by cutting: The athlete had surgery on his knee.
b. A procedure that is part of this treatment; an operation: The doctor performed three surgeries this morning.
3. An operating room or a laboratory of a surgeon or of a hospital's surgical staff: How long has the patient been in surgery?
4. Chiefly British
a. A physician's, dentist's, or veterinarian's office.
b. The period during which a physician, dentist, or veterinarian consults with or treats patients in the office.

surgery

[sur′jərē]
Etymology: Gk, cheirourgia
the branch of medicine concerned with diseases and trauma requiring operative procedures. surgical, adj.
enlarge picture
Operating room for surgery

surgery

Medspeak
An intervention in which a body site is accessed via an incision on a mucocutaneous surface, most commonly the skin, and tissue excised, added to or manipulated to manage an injury, or to revise or renovate a failing part or aesthetically enhance the tissue’s owner.

Medspeak-UK
A place where a doctor, dentist or other healthcare practitioner treats or advises patients.

surgery

1. That branch of 'procedural' medicine which addresses physical defects and/or acquired lesions by operative design.
2. Any procedure to remove or repair damaged tissues or diagnose disease. See Abdominal surgery, Band-Aid surgery, Beating heart surgery, Billboard surgery, Brain-graft surgery, Cancer surgery, Cataract surgery, Cardiothoracic surgery, Cardiovascular surgery, Chemosurgery, Conservative surgery, Cosmetic surgery, Cranial base surgery, Craniofacial surgery, Debulking surgery, Dermatologic surgery, Dry run surgery, Disfiguring surgery, Elective surgery, Emergency surgery, Esthetic surgery, Facial plastic & reconstructive surgery, Functional (endonasal) endoscopic sinus surgery, Ghost surgery, Hand surgery, Hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery, Head & neck surgery, Heart port surgery, Heroic surgery, Image-directed surgery, Keyhole surgery, Kiss of death surgery, Laparoscopic surgery, Laser surgery, Love surgery, Lung-reduction surgery, Major surgery, Mastoid surgery, MIDCAB surgery, Minimally invasive surgery, Minimally invasive cardiac surgery, Minimally invasive valve surgery, Minor surgery, Mohs surgery, Mutilating surgery, Neurosurgery surgery, Nintendo® surgery, No problem surgery, Open heart surgery, Optional surgery, Outpatient surgery, Palliative surgery, Perineal surgery, Phonosurgery, Port access surgery, Psychosurgery, Radiation surgery, Radical surgery, Radioimmunoguided surgery, Reconstructive surgery, Re-do vascular surgery, Refractive surgery, Required surgery, Robotic surgery, Roller ball surgery, Same-day surgery, Second-look surgery, Stereotactic radiosurgery, Thoracic surgery, Tommy John elbow surgery, Unnecessary surgery, Urgent surgery, Videotaped surgery.

sur·ger·y

(sŭr'jĕr-ē)
1. The branch of medicine concerned with the treatment of disease, injury, and deformity by operation or manipulation.
2. The performance or procedures of a surgical operation.
[L. chirurgia; G. cheir, hand, + ergon, work]

surgery

1. The treatment of disease, injury and deformity by physical, manual or instrumental interventions.
2. The diagnosis of conditions treated in this way.
3. The practice of operative treatment.
4. A room or suite used for medical consultation and treatment. From the Greek cheirourgia , hand work, as in cheir , hand and ergon , work.

surgery,

n medical procedure in which the body is manually cut open to treat medical conditions.

sur·ger·y

(sŭr'jĕr-ē)
1. Branch of medicine concerned with treatment of disease, injury, and deformity by physical operation or manipulation.
2. Performance or procedures of an operation.
[L. chirurgia; G. cheir, hand, + ergon, work]

surgery,

n work performed by a surgeon.
surgery, access flap in osseous,
n a full-thickness or split-thickness flap created for the purpose of gaining access to the alveolar bone when surgical remodeling is indicated.
surgery, apically repositioned flap in mucogingival,
n a surgically created flap of gingival tissue that is repositioned apically to maintain or create a functionally adequate zone of attached gingiva. In the surgical procedure the existing attached and free gingiva is detached by employing a reverse bevel incision and apically repositioning the flap.
surgery, cosmetic,
n surgery whose purpose is to improve external appearance rather than general health.
surgery, first-stage,
n See surgery, stage-one.
surgery, full flap in mucogingival,
n a flap in which all the soft tissue elements are raised and repositioned, as opposed to the split-thickness flap.
surgery, mucogingival,
n surgical procedure designed to retain a functionally adequate zone of gingiva after surgical pocket elimination, create a functionally adequate zone of attached gingiva, alter the position of or eliminate a frenum, or deepen the vestibule.
surgery, oblique flap in mucogingival,
n an increased band of attached gingiva created by preparing a narrow papillary flap (to avoid donor site radicular recession), which is then rotated 90° and sutured into the prepared recipient site.
surgery, osseous,
n the therapeutic surgical measures used and designed to eliminate osseous deformities by means of ostectomy or osteoplasty or create a favorable environment by means of meticulous removal of the soft tissue contents of the infrabony osseous defect for the formation of new bone, periodontal membrane, and cementum to fill in the area of bone resorption.
surgery, pedicle flap in mucogingival,
n an increased band of attached gingiva created to repair a cleft by using proximal gingiva situated mesial and distal to the cleft, because gingiva in either location alone is not wide enough to cover the cleft if repositioned. The pedicles are repositioned laterally and sutured. Also called a
double papilla procedure.
surgery, second-stage,
n See surgery, stage-two.
surgery, stage-one,
n a surgical procedure in which an endosseous two-stage implant is placed in the bone and the soft tissue over the implant is sutured closed to allow osseointegration of the implant before the abutment and prosthesis are attached; also known as
first-stage surgery.
surgery, stage-two,
n a surgical procedure in which the soft tissue over a submerged implant is removed in order to place an abutment into the implant; also known as
second-stage surgery.

surgery

1. that branch of veterinary science which treats diseases, injuries and deformities by manual or operative methods.
2. the place in a hospital, or doctor's or dentist's office where surgery is performed.
3. in some countries a room or office where a veterinarian sees and treats patients.
4. the work performed by a surgeon.

basic surgery kit
the collection of instruments, wrapped, sterilized and ready for use in the majority of uncomplicated surgical procedures. The choice of instruments may vary from one surgeon to another, but generally there are tissue forceps, thumb forceps, sponge forceps, hemostats, towel clamps, scalpel handle and needle holder. Scissors and needles may be added after cold sterilization.
bench surgery
surgery performed on an organ that has been removed from the body, after which it is reimplanted.
cold steel surgery
that performed with traditional cutting instruments; to distinguish from cryosurgical and electrosurgical methods.
cosmetic surgery
performed to improve the appearance, or change the appearance, of the animal; surgery that is not necessary for the health of the animal. Other than ear cropping and tail docking, where performed, generally discouraged or considered unethical for animals as it is usually done for purposes of improving their appearance in the show ring or to disguise traits that might be heritable.
elective surgery
surgery carried out at a time convenient to client and surgeon. The opposite of emergency surgery. Distinctly different to cosmetic surgery.
experimental surgery
that carried out as part of a planned experimental protocol, usually on animals selected specifically for the purpose and which are often sacrificed afterwards. Increasingly, use of animals in this way is under the control of institutional or governmental authorities.
plastic surgery
that concerned with the restoration, reconstruction, correction or improvement in the shape and appearance of body structures that are defective, damaged or misshapen by injury, disease or anomalous growth and development.
replacement surgery
transplanting of tissues or organs from another host. Not commonly undertaken in veterinary surgery.
veterinary surgery
see veterinary surgery.

Patient discussion about surgery

Q. I am worried how safe the operation would be and the post surgery complications? My wife has a cyst in her right breast and further tests are going on. Doctors have advised to go for an operation. I am worried how safe the operation would be and the post surgery complications?

A. My friend, surgery for the cyst in breast is common. Any cyst in breast indicates breast cancer. These surgeries are very safe. Initially they used to cut the complete breast to remove the cyst. Now with the advanced technology, only the cyst would be removed without harming other tissues. Rather complete removal is done these days, but that depend upon the severity of the cancer. These surgeries are proven with results. If the cyst is less they will remove only the affected portion and yes they do remove some nearby tissues because there some cancer cells may lay and can arrive again. For any post surgery complications, chemotherapy treatment is also available.

Q. Should I do surgery for varicoceles? I went to an urologist and he recommended surgery, but I don’t know if I should do this…is it dangerous? Can I live with the varicocele?

A. I don’t see your problem, you said an urologist advised you to do so- that should be enough no? if you don’t trust him, go and get a second opinion. The surgery is not that bad, an hour later and you are walking out. Vary small risk of complication. I did it and it was fine.

Q. What types of gastric bypass surgeries are there? I heard all sorts of options for gastric bypass are available. What is the most in use?

A. Bariatric surgeries or – gastric bypass surgeries for weight loss fall into three categories: Restrictive procedures make the stomach smaller to limit the amount of food intake, malabsorptive techniques reduce the amount of intestine that comes in contact with food so that the body absorbs fewer calories, and combination operations employ both restriction and malabsorption. The exact one to be done should be decided with the physician according to each patients abilities and pre-operative function level.

More discussions about surgery
References in periodicals archive ?
I quickly reply, "He's the guy who said wash your hands twenty years before Joseph Lister got the credit for antiseptic surgery.
In addition, the advent of antiseptic surgery in the late 19th century reduced the mortality from injuries and operations and increased the range of surgical work.
05 Salisbury Joseph Lister was the inventor of antiseptic surgery.