antisepsis


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antisepsis

 [an″tĭ-sep´sis]
1. the prevention of sepsis.
2. any procedure that reduces to a significant degree the microbial flora of skin or mucous membranes. See also antiseptic.

an·ti·sep·sis

(an'tē-sep'sis),
Prevention of infection by inhibiting the growth of infectious agents.
See also: disinfection.
[anti- + G. sēpsis, putrefaction]

antisepsis

/an·ti·sep·sis/ (an″tĭ-sep´sis)
1. the prevention of sepsis by antiseptic means.
2. any procedure that reduces to a significant degree the microbial flora of skin or mucous membranes.

antisepsis

(ăn′tĭ-sĕp′sĭs)
n.
Destruction of disease-causing microorganisms to prevent infection.

antisepsis

[-sep′sis]
Etymology: Gk, anti + sepein, putrefaction
processes, procedures, or chemical treatments that kill or inhibit microorganisms to prevent infection.

antisepsis

Infection control A general term for procedures or chemical treatments intended to kill or inhibit microbial growth

an·ti·sep·sis

(an'ti-sep'sis)
Prevention of infection by inhibiting the growth of infectious agents.
See also: disinfection
[anti- + G. sēpsis, putrefaction]

antisepsis

The use of strong poisons to kill bacteria and other dangerous microorganisms. Antisepsis is still used in the cleansing of wounds and skin and for the sterilization of surgical instruments, but modern surgery would not be possible using antisepsis alone. See also ASEPSIS.

antisepsis

see ANTISEPTIC.

antisepsis

use of agents to inhibit microorganisms, i.e. topical agents (for skin and hard surfaces); high-pressure steam sterilizers (autoclaves - for instruments); electromagnetic radiation (gamma radiation - for scalpel blades)

an·ti·sep·sis

(an'ti-sep'sis)
Prevention of infection by inhibiting the growth of infectious agents.
See also: disinfection
[anti- + G. sēpsis, putrefaction]

antisepsis (an´tīsep´sis),

n the prevention of infection of a body surface, usually skin or oral mucosa, through the application of an antimicrobial agent.

antisepsis

prevention of sepsis by destruction of microorganisms and infective matter. Usually refers to cleansing the skin or mucous membranes of pathogenic organisms, but with resident flora remaining.
References in periodicals archive ?
He made great strides in introducing antisepsis into the surgical modus operandi.
But the pioneering work of men like Joseph Lister dramatically switched the odds in the patient's favour and soon antisepsis was followed by asepsis as, instead of trying to destroy micro-organisms, doctors made moves to exclude bacteria totally from the operating theatre.
Furst has the good sense and a sufficiently broad knowledge of the field to chart the evolution of medical technology (from percussion and stethoscopes to antisepsis and anaethesia, germ theory and x-rays).
APIC guidelines for handwashing and hand antisepsis in health care settings.
Pruett (1991), "Surgical Antisepsis," Disinfection, Sterilization, and Preservation, (4th ed.
Since then, the white coat of the physician has come to symbolize sterile technique and antisepsis, and to this day it is synonymous with the scientific basis of medicine.
Such antisepsis might, perhaps, create the atmosphere in which solutions become possible.
Sage[R] 2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate Cloths -- Patient Preoperative Skin Preparation - contains 500mg of rinse-free 2% CHG solution per cloth for rapid, broad spectrum skin antisepsis with persistent activity.
Material supply health antisepsis, hospital cleaning and disinfection.
From comprehensive surface disinfection, including advanced ultraviolet technology, to skin antisepsis, we are committed to providing efficacious solutions to the healthcare community.
8) The concept of joint replacement was initially accepted with much excitement; however, due to lack of intraoperative antisepsis and the practice of joint replacement in actively infected joints, most, if not all, joints implanted by Dr.
The research covers hand wash, hand disinfectant and surgical hand antisepsis products across the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Benelux and Scandinavia.