antipathy


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Related to antipathy: Antipathic, antipathetic

antipathy

[antip′əthē]
Etymology: Gk, anti + pathos, suffering
a strong feeling of aversion or antagonism to particular objects, situations, or individuals. antipathic, adj.

an·ti·pa·thy

(an-tip'ă-thē)
Aversion, repugnance, intolerance.
[G. antipatheia]

antipathy

(an-tip′ă-thē) [ anti- + -pathy]
1. A feeling of strong aversion.
2. An object of strong aversion.
antipathic (ant″i-path′ik), adjective
References in classic literature ?
But I hope you will not carry your antipathy so far as to deprive me of the pleasure of your company, sir," said Monte Cristo.
La Ramee cast an inquiring look around him and observing the same signs of antipathy between the prisoner and his guardian he smiled in token of his inward satisfaction.
In truth, his own antipathy to the veil was known to be so great, that he never willingly passed before a mirror, nor stooped to drink at a still fountain, lest, in its peaceful bosom, he should be affrighted by himself.
But this was not all; the antipathy which had sprung up between myself and my employer striking deeper root and spreading denser shade daily, excluded me from every glimpse of the sunshine of life; and I began to feel like a plant growing in humid darkness out of the slimy walls of a well.
The air being pure, and the day fine, the party continued conversing on the rock, until the wheels of Judge Temple’s carriage were heard clattering up the side of the mountain, during which time the conversation was maintained with deep interest, each moment clearing up some doubtful action, and lessening the antipathy of the youth to Marmaduke.
There must always have been an antipathy between our natures.
There was not dislike merely; there was acute antipathy.
It was the sense of his helplessness that sharpened his antipathy.
Perhaps it was her father's naive stratagems for the enmeshing of a wealthy husband that had produced in her at last a morbid antipathy to the idea of playing beggar-maid to any man's King Cophetua.
The Turks have an innate antipathy to taking the life of any dumb animal, it is said.
And the invocation was uttered in such a tone as to indicate a rooted antipathy to anything so commonplace, even if she had not added that sequins gave her the sick.
It arises, I suppose, from a natural antipathy to anything of the kind.