antinomy

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an·tin·o·my

(an-tin'ō-mē), Do not confuse this word with antimony.
A contradiction between two principles, each of which is considered true.
[anti- + G. nomos, law]

antinomy

A contradiction between two rules or laws, each of which is considered true.

True contradictions are not known to exist in science, only disparate explanations for poorly-understood phenomena in the biophysical universe.

an·tin·o·my

(an-tinŏ-mē) Do not confuse this word with antimony.
A contradiction between two principles, each of which is considered true.
[anti- + G. nomos, law]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Achebe's titular choice provides some antinomies as well.
On the antinomies of post-Minimalist sculpture, see James Meyer, "The Minimal Unconscious," October 130 (Fall 2009): 174-76.
But behind the phenomena stands the inaccessible noumenal realm, which of course (also by definition) cannot be verified empirically but must be hypothesized to make sense of reason's limitations discovered through the antinomies.
The detailed attention to physiological features in this quotation is reflective of her entrapment at this stage in colonial antinomies and essentialism.
The Antinomies of Latin American Discourses of Identity and their Fictional Representation.
The obscure bears up the brilliance," Stetie writes: to live, via the poetic, such antinomies, which are simultaneously "equivalences," is to reach through to something of that indivisibleness--that principle of ubiquitous embrace, perhaps--at the center of being, which allows us to understand, instinctively, to what degree "the rose has no why" (Stetie quoting Silesius): to what degree we inhabit and unfold the ineffable.
Jameson's dazzling, synthesizing treatment of globalization, unlike so many others, does not seek to resolve the antinomies it raises.
The politics and aesthetics Laing suggests for coping with the antinomies of technocratic globalization is a flexible and humorous contingency" (200), Gaylard argues in one of his article's most intelligent passages, asserting the possibility that Laing's novel creates its own version of the traditional African trickster figure to embody the paradoxes, ambiguities, and ambivalences of technological globalization.
Its own inflections on rifts and contradictions place Teskey's book within the compass of a newly emerging Milton criticism where attention turns to "antinomies" and where, in their turn, those antinomies revolve around the question of whether "the theological and political systems of Milton's epic successfully coincide," or whether, rubbing against one another, they create the "friction" (114) that a new criticism regards as the principal signature of Milton's poetry.
Recognizing (as thankfully all of the editors of this series have) that "Coleridge was always a religious writer of one kind or another" (155), Vallins relates Coleridge's lifelong concern with understanding and divine Reason to the equally lifelong concern with the sublime, specifically in his "fascination with paradoxes or antinomies which he uses to evoke the inability of the understanding to form any conception of the ideas of Reason" (156).
More realistically, Caleb Williams explores the inability of consciousness to escape from its antinomies, which make the mind (as Hegel was to say) both master and slave.
This thread leads to a discussion of Utopian intertextuality and to an analysis of some of the familiar antinomies to be found in utopias, like city and country utopias, or utopias of work versus those of leisure, and so on.