antinomy

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an·tin·o·my

(an-tin'ō-mē), Do not confuse this word with antimony.
A contradiction between two principles, each of which is considered true.
[anti- + G. nomos, law]

antinomy

A contradiction between two rules or laws, each of which is considered true.

True contradictions are not known to exist in science, only disparate explanations for poorly-understood phenomena in the biophysical universe.

an·tin·o·my

(an-tinŏ-mē) Do not confuse this word with antimony.
A contradiction between two principles, each of which is considered true.
[anti- + G. nomos, law]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Enclosed within an antinomic discourse of sovereignty and rights, each side of the argument poisons the credibility of the other while remaining unable to establish its own uncontested hegemony.
Rather than force one side or the other to abandon its theological convictions before unity can be restored, it may be that the antinomic nature of truth permits them to be synthesized into a fuller understanding of Peter's continued role in the church.
the division between the discursive orders of the museum, the market, the media, the collectors, and, formerly, the historian and the critic) and the dissolution of actual criteria according to which the antinomic hierarchy of artistic production could be evaluated.
Theology's function is to give expression to the divine-human communion in Christ, which reveals the antinomic God--the God who is radically immanent in Christ and whose very immanence reveals God's radical transcendence.
Inescapably antinomic, it locates immortality, reason and the transcendental within mortality, sexual merging and exchange.
In Seminar XI, Lacan describes the paradoxical relationship between the gaze and the eye: "In the scopic field, everything is articulated between two terms that act in an antinomic way - on the side of things, there is the gaze, that is to say, things look at me, and yet I see them" (Four Fundamental 109).
49) One of the achievements of the passage is that, while it contains perhaps the single most dramatically effective sequence in Keats's poetry, the speaker's near-death on the stairway, it also conveys the antinomic nature of time in Moneta's temple.
s ideas before the publication of his major trilogy but also presents with brevity and clarity his antinomic method, which is obscure in other works (35-36).