antiparticle

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Related to antimatter: black hole, CERN, dark matter

antiparticle

 [an″tĭ-pahr´tĭ-k'l]
either of a pair of elementary particles that have electric charges and magnetic moments of opposite sign and are the same in all other properties, such as mass, lifetime, and spin, e.g., the electron and positron. Every particle has an antiparticle. When antiparticles collide, they are annihilated, and their mass is converted to energy in the form of gamma rays.
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While antimatter is rare, a huge amount of energy is released when particles collide with antiparticles, which many see as a new form of energy.
Santilli's detection of antimatter galaxies is evident not only for the ensuing new conception of the universe, but also for the protection of our planet against antimatter asteroids.
It is definitely a jet of unmatter, because a plasma consisting of the electrons and the positrons is neither matter nor antimatter in the same time.
There is considerable speculation as to why the observable universe is apparently almost entirely matter, whether other places are almost entirely antimatter, and what might be possible if antimatter could be harnessed.
With the restart of CERN's accelerator chain getting underway, the laboratory's antimatter research programme is set to resume soon.
But most of the matter and antimatter destroyed each other, leaving surplus matter that became today's stars and galaxies.
This is the first time antimatter has been captured in a "normal" state rather than the short-lived.
Although antimatter particles have been known about and created in labs for some time, they had never before been held in captivity, so to speak.
Holding the antimatter in a vacuum for this fraction of a second allowed the physicists to study the atoms, CERN said in an article in the British journal Nature.
ANTIMATTER has long been a staple of science fiction, Star Trek's USS Enterprise is powered by the stuff.
Leading physicist Professor Frank Close, of Oxford University, will attempt to answer that question when he discusses the mysterious concept of antimatter at Huddersfield University on Wednesday (6.
Students will read about the Big Bang theory, how the universe may end, what stars and planets are made of, black holes, eclipses, the lifecycle of a star, nebulae, going supernova, antimatter, dark matter, the Milky Way, how rockets work, Projects Mercury, Vostok, and Gemini, the Apollo program, the space shuttle, and space probes.