antimanic

antimanic

(ant″i-man′ik) [ anti- + manic]
1. Preventing or relieving bipolar disorder.
2. An agent that prevents or treats bipolar disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
2011), an indicator of serious mental illness (defined as having a diagnosis of any psychotic, mania or bipolar disorders, or use of antipsychotic or antimanic medication in the preperiod), and an indicator of need for drug/alcohol treatment in the preperiod as described above (Sears et al.
Manic period EEG was recorded before the onset of antimanic treatment, depending on the severity of the mania.
The study he ran enrolled patients who had cycled into a new major depressive episode after treatment with antimanic drugs for at least 4 weeks.
Medications efficacious in the treatment of mania or hypomania include antimanic agents.
He inquired about antipsychotic, antidepressive, and antimanic medications and found out that almost three-quarters of them were indeed vegetarian.
The antimanic properties of valproate were quickly recognized following its introduction as an anticonvulsant, and it became a prophylactic agent for bipolar disorders.
Nearly half of the patients taking SSRIs first line receive these drugs as a monotherapy, despite guideline recommendations to give bipolar patients presenting with depression an antimanic first line.
The emphasis is on presenting information that is practical and useful about antipsychotic medications, medications for neurological side effects and illnesses, every class of antidepressants including instrumental therapies such as ECT and rTMS, recognized and experimental antimanic drugs and mood stabilizers, hypnotics, medications for substance abuse and herbal therapies.
Fast-forward a decade or so and lithium became generally in use, which, of course, is an antithyroid agent as well as an antimanic agent.
Fifty years after the first report of its antimanic effects (1), lithium remains a first-choice mood stabilizer for preventing relapses in bipolar disorders (1-3).
But data on newer antimanic drugs are sparse, putting the clinician between a teratologic rock and a clinical hard place.
1992) A more thorough evaluation, however, suggests that little evidence exists of a clinically meaningful interaction between disulfiram and medications commonly prescribed to treat major psychiatric disorders, including antidepressants, antipsychotics, and antimanic agents (Larson et al.