osteomalacia

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osteomalacia

 [os″te-o-mah-la´shah]
softening of the bones, resulting from impaired mineralization, with excess accumulation of osteoid, caused by a vitamin D deficiency in adults. A similar condition in children is called rickets. The deficiency may be due to lack of exposure to ultraviolet rays, inadequate intake of vitamin D in the diet, or failure to absorb or utilize vitamin D. There is decalcification of the bones, particularly those of the spine, pelvis, and lower extremities. X-ray examination reveals transverse, fracture-like lines in the affected bones and areas of demineralization in the matrix of the bone. As the bones soften they become bent, flattened, or otherwise deformed. Treatment consists of administration of large daily doses of vitamin D and dietary measures to insure adequate calcium and phosphorus intake. adj., adj osteomala´cic.
antacid-induced osteomalacia osteomalacia in which the combination of low dietary phosphorus intake and chronic excessive consumption of aluminum hydroxide–containing antacids has led to phosphate depletion; characteristics include hypophosphatemia, nephrolithiasis, anorexia, muscle weakness, and bone loss.
anticonvulsant osteomalacia
1. osteomalacia occurring in anticonvulsant rickets of children.
hepatic osteomalacia osteomalacia as a complication of cholestatic liver disease, which may lead to severe bone pain and multiple fractures.
oncogenic osteomalacia a type seen in association with usually benign mesenchymal neoplasms. The tumors appear to produce a substance that impairs renal tubular functions and leads to hypophosphatemia. Called also tumor-induced osteomalacia.
puerperal osteomalacia a type resulting from exhaustion of skeletal stores of calcium and phosphorus by repeated pregnancies and lactation.
renal tubular osteomalacia a type resulting from acidosis and hypercalciuria when deficient renal tubular activity has caused inability to produce acid urine or ammonia.
senile osteomalacia softening of bones in old age due to vitamin D deficiency.
tumor-induced osteomalacia oncogenic osteomalacia.

os·te·o·ma·la·ci·a

(os'tē-ō-mă-lā'shē-ă),
A disease in adults characterized by a gradual softening and bending of the bones with varying severity of pain; softening occurs because the bones contain osteoid tissue that has failed to calcify because of lack of vitamin D or renal tubular dysfunction; more common in women than in men, osteomalacia often begins during pregnancy.
[osteo- + G. malakia, softness]

osteomalacia

/os·teo·ma·la·cia/ (os″te-o-mah-la´shah) inadequate or delayed mineralization of osteoid in mature cortical and spongy bone; it is the adult equivalent of rickets and accompanies that disorder in children.osteomala´cic
hepatic osteomalacia  osteomalacia as a complication of cholestatic liver disease, which may lead to severe bone pain and multiple fractures.
oncogenic osteomalacia , tumor-induced osteomalacia osteomalacia occurring in association with mesenchymal neoplasms, which are usually benign.

osteomalacia

(ŏs′tē-ō-mə-lā′shə, -shē-ə)
n.
A bone disease in adults analogous to rickets in children, marked by bone demineralization caused by impaired metabolism or deficiency of vitamin D or phosphorus.

osteomalacia

[-məlā′shə]
Etymology: Gk, osteon + malakia, softening
an abnormal condition of lamellar bone, characterized by a loss of calcification of the matrix and resulting in softening of the bone. It is accompanied by weakness, fracture, pain, anorexia, and weight loss. The condition is the result of an inadequate amount of phosphorus and calcium available in the blood for mineralization of the bones. This deficiency may be caused by a diet lacking these minerals or vitamin D, by a lack of exposure to sunlight and hence an inability to synthesize vitamin D, or by a metabolic disorder causing malabsorption of minerals. Osteomalacia results from and also complicates many other diseases and conditions. Treatment usually includes administration of the necessary vitamins and minerals and therapy appropriate for the underlying disorder. Also called adult rickets. See also hyperparathyroidism, Paget's disease, rickets.
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Osteomalacia

osteomalacia

Nutritional rickets A condition characterized by softened bones due to poor mineralization occurring in a background of vitamin D deficiency Clinical Weak, deformed, and deformable bone, which in children may be manifest by craniotabes, bowlegs, and knock knees, rachitic rosary, ↓ ventilation, often accompanied by pneumonia, muscular weakness, ↓ appetite, hypocalcemia Treatment Vitamin D. See Osteogenic osteomalacia, Rickets.

os·te·o·ma·la·ci·a

(os'tē-ō-mă-lā'shē-ă)
A disease characterized by a gradual softening and bending of the bones with varying severity of pain; softening occurs because the bones contain osteoid tissue which has failed to calcify due to lack of vitamin D or renal tubular dysfunction.
Synonym(s): adult rickets, late rickets.
[osteo- + G. malakia, softness]

osteomalacia

Bone softening as a result of defective mineralization, usually occurring because of defective calcium absorption from vitamin D deficiency. Osteomalacia is commoner in women than in men. The softened bones may distort or bend under the body weight. The condition is treated with vitamin D.

Osteomalacia

Osteomalacia is a bone disease that occurs in adults and is caused by a prolonged period of vitamin D deficiency.

osteomalacia

bone decalcification due to infection, metabolic or renal deficiency
  • infantile osteomalacia; juvenile osteomalacia; childhood osteomalacia see rickets

os·te·o·ma·la·ci·a

(os'tē-ō-mă-lā'shē-ă)
Disease in adults characterized by a gradual softening and bending of bones with varying severity of pain.
Synonym(s): adult rickets.
[osteo- + G. malakia, softness]

osteomalacia (os´tēōməlā´shēə, -shə),

n a systemic disorder of bone characterized by decreased mineralization of bone matrix possibly resulting from vitamin D deficiency, inadequate calcium in the diet, renal disease, and/or steatorrhea. Manifestations include incomplete fractures and gradual resorption of cortical and cancellous bone.

osteomalacia

softening of the bones of adult animals, resulting from impaired mineralization, with excess accumulation of osteoid, caused by a nutritional deficiency of vitamin D or phosphorus. The clinical signs are those of a painful condition of the bones and joints, including stiff gait, lameness, restlessness while standing, cracking sounds in the joints while walking, an abnormal posture including an arched back. Affected animals are disinclined to move and lie down for long periods. Fractures and tendon ruptures occur frequently and pelvic deformity may cause dystocia. Called also stifsiekte, stiffs, creeps, peglegs, cripples, bog-lame, milk-leg, milk-lame.