anticipate

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Related to anticipatory: anticipatory socialization, anticipatory anxiety

anticipate

 [an-tis´ĭ-pāt]
to expect a given reaction from someone, such as a patient.

an·tic·i·pate

(an-tis'i-pāt),
To come before the appointed time; said of a periodic symptom or disease, such as a malarial paroxysm, when it recurs at progressively shorter intervals.
[L. anticipo, pp. -cipatus, to anticipate, fr. anti (old form of ante), before, + capio, to take]

anticipate

(an-tis′ĭ-pāt″) [L. anticapare, to take before]
1. To occur before the usual time of onset (of a particular illness or disease).
2. In nursing and medicine, to expect, predict, or prepare for something outside the routine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since Varun's interim anticipatory bail granted earlier by the Delhi High Court is scheduled to expire on Friday, the grandson of former prime minister Indira Gandhi now faces imminent arrest and the possibility of him contesting the upcoming Lok Sabha polls from behind bars appears real.
In contrast, fewer than 14% of adults displayed symptoms of anticipatory nausea and 2% or less symptoms of anticipatory vomiting when granisetron was administered during repeat cycle chemotherapy (19,20).
On appeal, the Ninth Circuit reversed, holding that "the particularity requirement of the Fourth Amendment applies with full force to the conditions precedent to an anticipatory search warrant.
The paper is organized as follows: Following this introduction is a review of the relevant literature on professional commitment and anticipatory socialization, along with the limited research conducted on demographic influences.
In the context of anticipatory assignments, however, the assignor often does not have dominion over the income on receipt.
14) For the litigator who files suit first against an adversary who then also files suit, the anticipatory suit exception is a potentially formidable argument against the first suit's priority.
If companies had to be more agile, more responsive to and anticipatory of market movements, then someone had to be at the helm, charting a course, constantly responding to shifts in the commercial wind and weather.
After reading the anticipatory rebuttal and the supplement released the next day, I'm feeling a little queasy myself.
The Skeels arrangement translates the gang rumblings and rhythms composed by Leonard Bernstein into the sounds of new romance being born and anticipatory excitement.
Just the opening of One Love has enough anticipatory tension to set up a major rock concert: To compelling drumbeats, eight muscular, bare-chested dancers walk slowly on to the stage, and line up, staring grimly ahead.
These men "anticipated an expansionary future," often giving away "prospective, speculative or anticipatory grants and titles.
As she says, "with the anticipatory quality that is always so surprising in Shakespeare, these plays deconstruct the bourgeois Cartesian subject, with its monadic fantasies of autonomy and self-determination, on the very eve (broadly speaking) of its historical inception, demonstrating through the exaggerated conditions of cultural notoriety what is nonetheless true for everyone, no matter how known or unknown" (151).