anticipate

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anticipate

 [an-tis´ĭ-pāt]
to expect a given reaction from someone, such as a patient.

an·tic·i·pate

(an-tis'i-pāt),
To come before the appointed time; said of a periodic symptom or disease, such as a malarial paroxysm, when it recurs at progressively shorter intervals.
[L. anticipo, pp. -cipatus, to anticipate, fr. anti (old form of ante), before, + capio, to take]

anticipate

(an-tis′ĭ-pāt″) [L. anticapare, to take before]
1. To occur before the usual time of onset (of a particular illness or disease).
2. In nursing and medicine, to expect, predict, or prepare for something outside the routine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The above problems are compounded by the fact that the "antimessiness" principle often leads the Court anticipatorily to tailor statutes and to reject plausible statutory constructions in order to avoid harms that are merely speculative.
In estimating our time series models, we varied the timing of the events by one and two months to allow for the possibility that the firm adjusted, either anticipatorily or with a lag, to new managers, union leaders, strikes, or slowdowns, and found that our basic results were robust in spite of these changes in timing.
Nevertheless, coins were issued by both Cossutia's family and Caesar's describing her anticipatorily as "Uxor Caesaris"--hence, no doubt, the confusion.
Moreover, the Supreme Court has suggested, in dicta, that an individual may not assert the Miranda-Edwards Fifth Amendment right to counsel anticipatorily.
According to the lawsuit, Rhone-Poulenc "failed to provide the assurances reasonably requested by Watson and thereby anticipatorily breached the Dilacor Agreements.
6) Thus, President Clinton could simply announce his intention not to agree to any conviction and expulsion from office based on the House's expired articles of impeachment and that they are hereby anticipatorily pocket-vetoed.
Hall and Dodge allowed taxpayers to avoid taxation on contingent income that was anticipatorily assigned to another, the fact that income is contingent on some future event is only one factor the courts use to determine tax consequences.
You can create time anticipatorily - you can have an idea of what movement you want to make, choreographing the movement, which you then perform with your hand.
But the painting could be a kind of Annunciation, the woman anticipatorily pregnant and the magical luminosity of the room the presence of the Holy Spirit.
We have in fact never held that a person can invoke his Miranda rights anticipatorily, in a context other than 'custodial interrogation' - which a preliminary hearing will not always, or even usually involve.
In these accounts, the behavior's consequent event appeared anticipatorily as a conditioned response, motive state, representation, or "expectancy" (Amsel, 1958; Gough, 1961; Hull, 1930; Meehl & MacCorquodale, 1951; Mowrer, 1947; Osgood, 1953; Rozeboom, 1958).
But under prevailing socio-historical conditions, according to Adorno, |[n]o artist can anticipatorily collect the antagonisms into meanings any longer, no more than the simultaneous, hardened society lets us envision the potential of the right one'.