anticholinesterase


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to anticholinesterase: anticholinesterase drugs

anticholinesterase

 [an″te-, an″ti-ko″lin-es´ter-ās]
an agent that inhibits acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme that breaks down acetylcholine at junctions of cholinergic nerve endings and effector organs or postsynaptic neurons; this permits the accumulation of acetylcholine and increases the stimulation of cholinergic receptors in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Called also cholinesterase inhibitor.

Organophosphate insecticides and chemical-warfare agents (nerve gases) are highly toxic “irreversible” anticholinesterases; “reversible” anticholinesterases such as neostigmine and physostigmine are used for treatment of myasthenia gravis, glaucoma, and smooth muscle atony of the gastrointestinal tract and for termination of the effect of nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents and cholinergic blocking agents. Poisoning by anticholinesterases is treated with atropine and the cholinesterase reactivator pralidoxime.

an·ti·cho·lin·es·ter·ase

(an'tē-kō-lin-es'ter-ās),
One of the drugs that inhibit or inactivate acetylcholinesterase, either reversibly (for example, physostigmine) or irreversibly (for example, tetraethyl pyrophosphate).

anticholinesterase

/an·ti·cho·lin·es·ter·ase/ (-ko″lin-es´ter-ās) cholinesterase inhibitor.

anticholinesterase

(ăn′tē-kō′lə-nĕs′tə-rās′, -rāz′, ăn′tī-)
n.
A substance that inhibits the activity of a cholinesterase, especially acetylcholinesterase.

anticholinesterase

[an′tikol′ənes′tərās]
a drug that inhibits or inactivates the action of acetylcholinesterase. Drugs of this class cause acetylcholine to accumulate at the junctions of various cholinergic nerve fibers and their effector sites or organs, allowing potentially continuous stimulation of cholinergic fibers throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. Anticholinesterases include physostigmine salicylate, neostigmine, edrophonium, and pyridostigmine. Neostigmine and pyridostigmine are prescribed in the treatment of myasthenia gravis; edrophonium in the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and the treatment of overdose of curariform drugs. Many agricultural insecticides have been developed from anticholinesterases; these are the highly toxic chemicals called organophosphates. Nerve gases developed as potential chemical warfare agents contain potent, irreversible forms of anticholinesterase.

anticholinesterase

Pharmacology An agent–eg, certain nerve gases, which blocks nerve impulses by inhibiting anticholinesterase Examples Insecticides–eg, parathion, and nerve gas agents–eg, sarin, soman, tabun; AChEs can be reversible or irreversible Action Eyes–hyperemia and pupillary constriction, GI tract—↑ GI contractions and secretion of gastric acid

an·ti·cho·lin·es·ter·ase

(AChE) (an'tē-kō-lin-es'tĕr-ās)
Any compound that inhibits or inactivates acetylcholinesterase, either reversibly (as e.g., physostigmine and other carbamates) or irreversibly (e.g., tetraethyl pyrophosphate and other organophosphorous compounds, including nerve agents).

anticholinesterase

Any substance opposing the action of the enzyme cholinesterase, which breaks down the NEUROTRANSMITTER acetylcholine, releasing the inactive choline for further synthesis to acetylcholine. An anticholinesterase agent thus potentiates the action of acetylcholine, a major neurotransmitter carrying nerve impulses across synapses and from nerves to muscles. Continued action causes serious effects. A number of organophosphorus insecticides and some nerve gases are anticholinesterases. Poisoning produces nausea, vomiting, sweating, salivation, restlessness, tightness of the chest, blurred vision, diarrhoea convulsions and death.

an·ti·cho·lin·es·ter·ase

(an'tē-kō-lin-es'tĕr-ās)
A drug that inhibits or inactivates acetylcholinesterase, either reversibly (e.g., physostigmine) or irreversibly (e.g., tetraethyl pyrophosphate).

anticholinesterase (an´tīkō´lines´-tərās),

n a drug or chemical that inhibits or inactivates the enzyme cholinesterase, resulting in the actions produced by the accumulation of acetylcholine at cholinergic sites.

anticholinesterase

a drug that inhibits the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, thereby potentiating the action of acetylcholine at postsynaptic membrane receptors in the parasympathetic nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Avian mortality events in the United States caused by anticholinesterase pesticides: a retrospective summary of National Wildlife Health Center records from 1980 to 2000.
In clinical trials, prophylactic administration of antipsychotics or anticholinesterase therapy to high-risk patients has had conflicting results.
Organophosphates exhibit an anticholinesterase activity which results in acetylcholine accumulation in synapses thus exerting a postsynaptic stimulating action causing hyperactivity and death in arthropods.
In recent controlled trials, administration of sage extracts, with known cholinergic characteristic improve behavioral and cognitive function in healthy young adults humans, and also improve memory and attention in healthy older volunteers by its anticholinesterase properties relevant to Alzheimer's disease therapy (Wake & al.
Pathophysiological and clinical aspects of combat anticholinesterase poisoning.
Further studies should consider the effect of medication, such as anticholinesterase (pyridostigmine) and immunosuppressive therapies, on facial emotion recognition.
Dimethoate is an anticholinesterase which disables cholinesterase enzyme and damages the central nervous system of insects [8, 9].
Its anticholinesterase activity is stronger than galantamine (a commonly used drug to treat Alzheimer's disease and various memory impairments).