anticarcinogenic

anticarcinogenic

[-kär′sinəjen′ik]
Etymology: Gk, anti, against, karkinos, crab, oma, tumor, genein, to produce
pertaining to a substance or device that neutralizes the effects of a cancer-causing substance.

an·ti·car·ci·no·genic

(an'tē-kahr'si-nō-jen'ik)
Tending to inhibit or prevent the activity of a carcinogen.

anticarcinogenic

(ant″i-kars″ĭn-ō-jen′ik) [ anti- + carcinogenic]
1. Tending to delay or prevent tumor formation.
2. A substance or action that prevents or delays tumor formation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our hypothesis is that lycopene's anticarcinogenic properties are due to its ability to enhance Gap Junctional Communication (GJC) between adjacent cells by increasing the available connexin proteins.
This study demonstrated that dry beans contain anticarcinogenic compounds capable of inhibiting AOM-induced colon cancer in rats.
of New York at Buffalo), discuss the possible anticarcinogenic effects of various dietary components.
Anticarcinogenic and hepatotoxic interactions between retinyl acetate and butylated hydroxytoluene in rats.
Hundreds of studies have illustrated various anticarcinogenic effects, many of which have been confirmed by adjunctive human studies.
Studies in animal models of cancer suggest that pomegranate fruit extract consumption may be anticarcinogenic, whereas studies in mice and humans indicate that it may also have a potential therapeutic and chemopreventive adjuvant effect in cardiovascular disorders.
Selenium also has an anticarcinogenic effect that is thought to be induced by the production of methylselenol, a selenometabolite that affects gene expression and modifies cell cycling and immune functions (3).
Ginger - this is high in vitamin C and a powerful antioxidant and anticarcinogenic.
The bright red of the fully ripe fruit holds the beneficial phytochemicals that give tomatoes their tangy taste as well as anticarcinogenic effects.
Her analysis of a cow's milk yield and composition also includes checking for conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a fatty acid produced in the rumen and credited with anticarcinogenic properties.
Looking specifically at spinach, which has been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties, among others, researchers were able to show that they could breed spinach that had much higher antioxidant properties.
Other researchers reported that polyphenolic compounds in green tea had anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects on skin, based on experimental studies and a review of published data.