anticancer diet

anticancer diet

[-kan′sər]
a diet, based on recommendations of the American Cancer Society, National Cancer Institute, and National Academy of Sciences, to reduce cancer risk factors associated with eating habits.

anticancer diet

Clinical nutrition A popular term for a series of dietary guidelines promulgated by the American Cancer Society, NCI, and American Institute for Cancer Research, which are intended to ↓ a person's risk of cancer. See Folk cures for cancer, Unproven methods for cancer management.
Anti-cancer diet–guidelines to ↓ cancer risk
  • ↓ Fat consumption, especially saturated fats
  • ↓ Consumption of smoked, salt-cured, and nitrate-cured foods, eg bacon, ham, cheese, corned beef, luncheon meats
  • ↓ Alcohol
  • ↑ High fiber foods, including whole grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables
  • ↑Foods rich in vitamins A and C, carotenoids, eg leafy green vegetables, citrus fruits, and red, orange, and yellow fruits & vegetables
  • ↑Cruciferous vegetables, eg broccoli and cabbage
Other recommendations
  • Avoid tobacco
  • Avoid refined sugar and salty foods
  • Lose weight
  • Exercise regularly and vigorously
.
References in periodicals archive ?
A anticancer diet is absolutely necessary since cancer patients need extra vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and other phytochemicals that have anticancer properties and stimulate liver, intestine, and kidney function.
The research also included an investigation into medical foods applications, such as the formation of a low-polyamine, anticancer diet to provide a better quality of life for patients with cancer.
Based on epidemiological data and animal studies, anticancer diets (SN: 10/1/83, p.