screening

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screening

 [skrēn´ing]
examination or testing of a group of individuals to separate those who are well from those who have an undiagnosed disease or defect or who are at high risk.
health screening in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as detecting health risks or problems by means of history, examination, and other procedures.
multiphasic screening (multiple screening) that in which various diagnostic procedures are employed during the same screening program.
prescriptive screening that performed for the early detection of disease or disease precursors in apparently well individuals so that health care can be provided early in the course of the disease or before the disease becomes manifest.
screening (omaha) in the omaha system, a target definition in the intervention scheme, denoting individual or group testing procedures, including measurements of vision, hearing, height, weight, development, scoliosis, blood pressure, and other qualities.

screen·ing

(skrēn'ing),
1. To screen (5).
2. Examination of a group of usually asymptomatic people to detect those with a high probability of having a given disease, typically by means of an inexpensive diagnostic test.
3. In the mental health professions, initial patient evaluation that includes medical and psychiatric history, mental status evaluation, and diagnostic formulation to determine the patient's suitability for a particular treatment modality.

screening

/screen·ing/ (skrēn´ing)
1. examination of a group to separate well persons from those who have an undiagnosed pathologic condition or who are at high risk.
2. fluoroscopy (Great Britain).

antibody screening  a method of determining the presence and amount of anti-HLA antibodies in the serum of a potential allograft recipient: aliquots of the recipient's serum are mixed with a panel of leukocytes from well-characterized cell donors, complement is added, and the percentage of cells that lyse (referred to as the panel-reactive antibody ) indicates the degree of sensitization of the recipient.

screening

(skrē′nĭng)
n.
1. The examination of a group of usually asymptomatic individuals to detect those with a high probability of having or developing a given disease, typically by means of an inexpensive diagnostic test.
2. The initial evaluation of a person, intended to determine suitability for a particular treatment modality.

screening

Etymology: ME, scren
1 a preliminary procedure, such as a test or examination, to detect the most characteristic sign or signs of a disorder that may require further investigation.
2 the examination of a large sample of a population to detect a specific disease or disorder, such as hypertension.

screening

Drug development
The process by which candidate substances for drug development are evaluated in a battery of assays (screens) designed to detect a specific biological property or activity. Screening can be conducted randomly, and substances tested without preselection criteria (which is highly inefficient) or targeted, where information on a substance with known activity and structure is used as a basis for selecting other similar substances on which to run the battery of tests.
 
Medspeak
A health service in which all members of a defined and currently asymptomatic population (e.g., sexually active women over age 18 or men over age 50) are evaluated by a screening test to detect a disease process (e.g., cancer (CA) or pre-CA of the uterine cervix in young women, or prostate CA in older men not known to have CA at the time of evaluation). Screening tests measure specific clinical (e.g., blood pressure for hypertension) or lab parameters (e.g., cholesterol for atherosclerosis or blood in stool for colorectal CA). Screening tests have high sensitivities and low specificities, allowing detection of most patients with a morbid condition, while having the acceptable disadvantage of a high rate of false positivity (screening tests by definition have a high sensitivity but low specificity).

Health screening recommendations (US)
Blood-pressure
Measured in normotensive persons every 2 years, all age groups.

Breast Cancer
Breast examination, in women by doctor-every year > age 40; mammography-every 1-2 years, age 35+, every year > age 50.
  
Cervical cytology
Pap smear every 1-3 years, starting from age of first intercourse.
 
Cholesterol
Measured-every 5 years, but not in younger subjects.

Colorectal cancer
Faecal-occult blood testing, from age 60 (UK) and age 50 (US).

Prostate
Rectal exam, ideally every year.

Molecular biology
The use of a low-stringency radiolabelled or biotinylated hybridisation probe to detect gene segments of potential interest from genomic or complementary DNA library.
 
Psychiatry
(1) Assessment to determine the appropriate services for a client.
(2) An assessment used to identify an increased risk of suicide in a group. In primary care settings, suicide screening is nearly worthless.
 
Trials
(1) The evaluation of individuals for potential enrollment in a trial screening (of sites).
(2) Determining the suitability of an investigative site and personnel to participate in a clinical trial.

screening (of sites)

A clinical trial term for assessing the suitability of an investigative site and personnel to participate in a study.

screening (of subjects)

The process of assessing a large group of potential subjects/patients for enrolment in a trial using a shotgun approach, in which a series of tests—e.g., measurement of cholesterol levels, blood pressure and so on—are used to stratify candidates into yes/no groups before focusing on specific individuals.

screening

Medtalk The evaluation of an asymptomatic person in a population, to detect an unsuspected disease process not known to exist at the time of evaluation; screening tests measure specific parameters–eg, bp–for HTN, sigmoidoscopy–colorectal CA, imaging–eg, mammography–breast CA or lab parameters–eg, cholesterol–CAD, guaiac-positive stools–colorectal CA or Pap smears of the uterine cervix–cervical CA; screening tests in general have high sensitivities and low specificities, which allows detection of most Pts with a morbid condition, while having the acceptable disadvantage of a high rate of false positivity. See Cancer screening, Colorectal screening, Developmental screening, Drug screening, Forensic drug screening, Genetic screening, Industry screening Microalbuminuria screening, Multiphasic screening, Newborn screening Psychiatry An assessment or evaluation to determine the appropriate services for a client.
Screening
Blood-pressure Measured in normotensive persons-every 2 years, all age groups
Breast examination, ♀ By physician-every year > age 40; mammography-every 1-2 years, age 35+, every year > age 50
Cervical cytology Pap smear every 1-3 years, starting at age of first intercourse
Cholesterol Measured-every 5 years, but not in younger subjects
Prostate Rectal exam, ideally every year

screen·ing

(skrēn'ing)
1. Examination of a group of usually asymptomatic people to detect those with a high probability of having a given disease, typically by means of an inexpensive diagnostic test.
2. mental health Initial patient evaluation that includes medical and psychiatric history, mental status evaluation, and diagnostic formulation to determine the patient's suitability for a particular treatment modality.

screening

The routine examination of numbers of apparently healthy people to identify those with a particular disease at an early stage.

Screening

Process through which carriers of a trait may be identified within a population.

screening

testing of an asymptomatic population to identify those who are susceptible to a given disease; identified/at-risk subjects may be offered disease treatment/preventive measures

screen·ing

(skrēn'ing)
1. To screen (4)
Synonym(s): Screen (3).
2. Examination of a group of usually asymptomatic people to detect those with a high probability of having a given disease, typically by means of an inexpensive diagnostic test.

screening,

n 1. an examination of individuals or their records to ascertain dental needs, assess treatment plans, or evaluate services rendered. Prescreening is the review by designated dental professionals of patients' examination records as a prerequisite to the authorization of some or all types of treatment. Postscreening is the examination by designated dental professionals, usually on a sample basis, of records to determine whether services have been rendered adequately and in accordance with prescribed administrative procedures.
2. a sample survey to determine initial treatment needs of a group seeking coverage under a dental plan; used in setting the initial premium.

screening

1. examination of a large sample of animals in a population in order to detect the presence of disease or to ascertain the prevalence of certain diseases, such as tuberculosis or diabetes mellitus.
2. in diagnostic tests the use of a test which has a high sensitivity but often only a moderate specificity. Usually this is a quick and cheap test which is followed by a more expensive but more accurate test carried out on the positive reactors to the screening test.
3. fluoroscopy or image intensification (Great Britain).

biochemical screening
using biochemical tests for purposes of detecting the presence of a disease.
multiphasic screening, multiple screening
simultaneous examination of a population for several different diseases.
preventive screening
screening of a population with a preventive medical program in prospect.
screening test
any test, e.g. tuberculin, brucellosis tests, used to screen a population.

Patient discussion about screening

Q. What are the screening methods for autism? I have a friend who has an autistic child. My daughter is 5 months old and I was wondering if there are any screening methods that help determine autism.

A. The general screening methods for autism are used by parents and pediatricians to evaluate a child’s irregular behavior for his/her age. As a parent, if you see any regression of the child- for instance, he was able to say mom and now he doesn’t say it anymore, or if a child hasn’t started speaking when they should. Those are reasons to go see someone about the possibility of autistic disorder.

Q. How can I lower the damage the cumputer screen is causing my eyes? I work with a computer for long hours every day and so far my sight is still good. Usually after many hours my eyes itch though. All my friends have already ruined their eyes this way and would really like to prevent that... Do you know how?

A. When people hardly concentrate on monitors, used to blink a little. Try to use neutral eyedops. Use only TFT monitors. Another good ways has written above :)

Q. What is cage questionnaire in screening of alcoholism and how effective is it?

A. CAGE questionnaire is a set of 4 questions to screen alcohol dependent person. A set of 4 question where if 2 are answered the alcoholism is diagnosed with various other tests. There are other type questionnaires like S-MAST, AUDIT, HSS, TWEAK, T-ACE, and CHARM. Questions asked are: (1) Have you ever felt you needed to Cut down on your drinking (2) Have people Annoyed you by criticizing your drinking? (3)Have you ever felt Guilty about drinking (4) have you Ever felt you needed a drink first thing in the morning to steady your nerves or to get rid of a hangover.

More discussions about screening
References in periodicals archive ?
7% of clinically significant antibodies failed to be detected in manual gel antibody screening tests and 11.
Antibody screening and identification panels are not yet available for routine use.
Four antibody screening assays were included in the evaluation: New Eitest ATL-EIA (Eisai), Serodia HTLV-I (Fujirebio), Western blot (Fujirebio), and CIA.
The company has integrated innovative technology platforms to address the major challenges to developing effective treatments for multiple oncology indications, with sTAg, a forward-looking proteomics approach to discovering novel tumor antigens, iTAb, a functional in vivo antibody screening approach, and next generation antibody-drug conjugate technology.
OmniAb (TM) integrates OMT's transgenic animal platforms, proven protein- and DNA-mediated immunization and Gel-Encapsulated Microenvironment (GEM) deep antibody screening to enable fast and cost-efficient generation and identification of preferred human therapeutic antibody candidates.
These include an in vitro selection platform, and its Patient Library/AffiScreen antibody screening technology that utilizes antibody repertoires from patients suffering from cancer and infectious diseases.
However, the sensitivity and specificity of GAD antibody screening have not been fully characterized, and the positive predictive value of screening varies from 20% to 70%, depending on the strategy applied and the population studied (2, 3, 5-7, 9-12).
Antibody screening of deer mouse populations throughout North America has provided evidence of SNV infection throughout most of the species' range (Ksiazek et al.
By using the MaxCyte flow electroporation platform, biopharmaceutical companies are improving the speed, biological relevance, and process design for their antibody screening and production.
For Rh (D) negative pregnant women is about the fetal Rh (D) typing in material blood, related serology and antibody screening (IEA) .
OmniAb (TM) integrates OMT's transgenic animal platforms, proven protein and DNA immunization and Gel-Encapsulated Microenvironment (GEM) deep antibody screening to enable fast and cost-efficient generation and identification of preferred human therapeutic antibody candidates.
Affitech A/S is a human antibody medicines company based on modern phage display technology coupled with powerful antibody screening and selection systems.