antibacterial

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Related to antibacterial resistance: Antibiotic resistance

antibacterial

 [an″te-, an″ti-bak-tēr´e-al]
1. destroying or suppressing the growth or reproduction of bacteria.
2. an agent having such properties.

an·ti·bac·te·ri·al

(an'tē-bak-tēr'ē-ăl),
Destructive to or preventing the growth of bacteria.

antibacterial

/an·ti·bac·te·ri·al/ (-bak-tēr´e-al) destroying or suppressing growth or reproduction of bacteria; also, an agent that does this.

antibacterial

(ăn′tē-băk-tîr′ē-əl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Destroying or inhibiting the growth of bacteria.
n.
An antibacterial substance.

an′ti·bac·te′ri·al n.

antibacterial

[-baktir′ē·əl]
Etymology: Gk, anti + bakterion, small staff
1 pertaining to a substance that kills bacteria or inhibits their growth or replication.
2 an antibacterial agent. Antibiotics synthesized chemically or derived from various microorganisms exert their bactericidal or bacteriostatic effect by interfering with the production of the bacterial plasma wall; by interfering with protein synthesis, nucleic acid synthesis, or plasma membrane integrity; or by inhibiting critical biosynthetic pathways in the bacteria.

antibacterial

adjective Referring to an agent or effect that suppresses or inhibits bacterial reproduction noun A general term for any agent that suppresses bacterial growth or destroys bacteria

an·ti·bac·te·ri·al

(an'tē-bak-tēr'ē-ăl)
Destructive to or preventing the growth of bacteria.

antibacterial

Effective against bacteria.

antibacterial

agent preventing bacterial growth, e.g. an antibiotic
  • topical antibacterial agents topical agents for the treatment of bacterial skin infections, e.g. 2% fusidic acid, 2% mupirocin (Bactroban), 0.25% neomycin (e.g. Cicatrin, Graneodin), 10 000 units polymyxin (Polyfax), 1% silver sulfadiazine (Flamazine)

antibiotic 

1. Pertaining to the ability to destroy or inhibit other living organisms.
2. A substance derived from a mould or bacterium, or produced synthetically, that destroys (bactericidal) or inhibits the growth (bacteriostatic) of other microorganisms and is thus used to treat infections. Some substances have a narrow spectrum of activity whereas others act against a wide range of both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms (broad-spectrum antibiotics). Antibiotics can be classified into several groups according to their mode of action on or within bacteria: (1) Drugs inhibiting bacterial cell wall synthesis, such as bacitracin, vancomycin and the β-lactams based agents (e.g. penicillin, cephalosporins (e.g. ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime). (2) Drugs affecting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, such as polymyxin B sulfate and gramicidin. (3) Drugs inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis, such as aminoglycosides (e.g. amikacin sulfate, framycetin sulfate, gentamicin, neomycin sulfate and tobramycin), tetracyclines, macrolides (e.g. erythromycin and azithromycin) and chloramphenicol. (4) Drugs inhibiting the intermediate metabolism of bacteria, such as sulfonamides (e.g. sulfacetamide sodium) and trimethoprim. (5) Drugs inhibiting bacterial DNA synthesis, such as nalixidic acid and fluoroquinolones (e.g. ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin). (6) Other antibiotics such as fusidic acid, the diamidines, such as propamidine isethionate and dibrompropamidine. Syn. antibacterial. See antiinflammatory drug; fusidic acid.

antibacterial

1. destroying or suppressing the growth or reproduction of bacteria.
2. an agent having such properties.

antibacterial agents
drugs that destroy or inhibit the growth of bacteria in concentrations that are safe for the host and can be used as chemotherapeutic agents to prevent or treat bacterial infections.
antibacterial resistance
consists of genetic factors, hormone levels, nutritional status, tissue enzymes, complement, interferon and immune mechanisms.
antibacterial sensitivity test
see antimicrobial sensitivity test.
antibacterial withdrawal time
the period that must elapse after treatment with an antibacterial agent ceases before the animal or its products can be marketed. Veterinarians who practice food animal medicine have a great responsibility to ensure that food of animal origin complies with pure food laws relating to their acceptable levels of drug residues. Drugs not registered for animal use should not be used and, for those that are, the legal withdrawal times must be observed.
antibacterial withholding
see antibiotic withdrawal time (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
In this Decision Resources report, we provide an overview of the mechanisms of resistance and the key pathogens involved in these resistant infections, discuss the impact of antibacterial resistance on outcomes and cost, highlight advantages and challenges of development in this market, outline the ideal characteristics of a novel hospital-based antibacterial, and review the near-term pipeline.
The conference focused on significant health issues of our time, including strategies for managing antibacterial resistance, West Nile Virus, and the growing number of children facing obesity.
The panel reported that "There is no convincing evidence that triclosan poses a risk to humans or to the environment by inducing or transmitting antibacterial resistance under current conditions of use.
Michael Draper, Associate Director at Paratek, "Tetracyclines are already an important class of drug in the fight against malaria, yet their broad-spectrum antibacterial activity is a disadvantage that potentially contributes to the problem of antibacterial resistance.
Numerous investigators have examined the effect of antibacterial resistance on the cost of care, particularly as it relates to length of hospital stay or increased number of antibacterial prescriptions written.
She later joined Merck Research Laboratories, where she worked for 21 years in the antibacterial discovery area, screening for novel antibacterials in both natural products and chemical collections, supporting chemical synthetic projects on improved antibacterials, evaluating preclinical drug candidates, and studying antibacterial resistance.
This technology prevents prolonged occlusive contact between the hand and the antimicrobial agent, which could cause antibacterial resistance, as well as skin irritations and sensitization.
Antibacterial resistance is high in developing countries (1) because of self-medication, the suboptimal quality of antibacterial drugs, and poor community and patient hygiene (2).
Yet despite a difficult regulatory environment -- driven by concerns over the development of antibacterial resistance in consumers of livestock products -- new products are still being launched.
The work of this consortium will generate diagnostics which we can use to match the right drug to the patient, help develop our emerging pipeline of pathogen-targeted antibacterials, and step up the fight against the threat of antibacterial resistance.
LONDON, October 19 /PRNewswire/ -- A new report suggests that growing antibacterial resistance is set to put antibiotic R&D back in vogue.
The global emergence of antibacterial resistance among common and atypical respiratory pathogens in the last decade necessitates the strategic application of antibacterial agents.