anti-thrombin III

anti-thrombin III

A 58-kD alpha2-glycoprotein with a single polypeptide chain that inactivates serine proteases (thrombin and other coagulation proteins, including factor Xa, IXa, kallikrein and others) by an irreversible heparin-dependent reaction.
 
Function
AT-III dissolves blood clots that normally form within the circulation; heparin’s anticoagulant activity hinges on activation of AT-III. Decreased AT-III may be a congenital AD condition or acquired, occurring in DIC (due to pulmonary tuberculosis) or in liver disease (due to decreased AT-III production), resulting in an increased risk of coagulation.
 
Ref range
0.15–0.45 mg/mL, or > 50% of lab’s control value.
 
Increased in
Acute hepatitis, post-renal transplant, inflammation, menstruation, vitamin K deficiency.

Decreased in
Congenital deficiency, liver transplant, DIC, nephrotic syndrome, cirrhosis, chonic liver disease, carcinoma, mid-menstrual cycle; AT-III is defective in 0.14% to 0.5% of the general population.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fibrinogen degradation products tend to be raised and concentrations of proteins C, S, and anti-thrombin III reduced (9).
Coagulation studies showed that the prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, bleeding time, factor VIII, fibrinogen, D-dimer, anti-thrombin III, protein C, and S levels were normal.
Anticoagulants Anti-thrombin III Agonists: Heparin, Low Molecular Weight Heparin, ATIII Inhibitors of Factor IIa (Thrombin) Inhibitors of Factor Xa Dual Inhibitors of Factor IIa and Xa Inhibitors of Factor IXa Inhbitors of Factor VII/Tissue Factor Inhibitors of Factor VIII Antiplatelet Agents Inhibitors of Platelet ADP Receptor Inhibitors of PAR-1 / Thrombin Receptor Antagonists of GPIIb/IIIa Antagonists of GPIb & von Willebrand Factor Antagonists of GPVI Antithrombotics
M118 is designed to interact at multiple points in the coagulation cascade by selectively binding to anti-thrombin III and thrombin, two critical factors in the formation of clots.
One study, led by Ursula Haussmann of the Division of Immunology/ Hematology/BMT, University Children's Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland; Growth and Development Centre, University Children's Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland, entitled, "Hepatic veno-occlusive disease in pediatric stem cell transplantation: impact of pre-emptive anti-thrombin III replacement and combined anti-thrombin III/Defibrotide therapy," was published in the peer-reviewed journal, "Haematologica/The Hematology Journal 2006.
Shakespeare played a key role in the market launch of several major new products, including Monoclonal Purified and Recombinant Factor VIII, Anti-Thrombin III and most importantly, the Hyland Intravenous Immune Globulin.
The binding of anti-thrombin III to these agents is required for the inhibition of coagulation enzymes such as Factor IIa and Factor Xa.