anthracycline


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anthracycline

 [an″thrah-si´klēn]
a class of antibiotics isolated from cultures of Streptomyces peucetius; it includes the antineoplastic agentsdaunorubicin and doxorubicin. The use of these drugs is limited by a chronic, cumulative, dose-related toxicity resulting in irreversible congestive heart failure.
Anthracycline. For daunorubicin, R1 = -CH3; for doxorubicin, R1 = -CHOH.

an·thra·cyc·line

(an'thra-sīk'lin, -lēn),
Anticancer agent consisting of three moieties: a pigmented aglycone, an amino sugar, and a lateral chain. Examples include doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and daunomycin (pirubicin).

anthracycline

/an·thra·cy·cline/ (-si´klēn) a class of antineoplastic antibiotics produced by Streptomyces peucetius and S. coeruleorubidus, including daunomycin and doxorubicin.
Enlarge picture
Anthracycline. For daunorubicin, R1=sbondCH3; for doxorubicin, R1=sbondCHOH.

anthracycline

Oncology A chemotherapeutic used in leukemia to prevent cell division Adverse effects Dose-dependent stomatitis, N&V and BM suppression which 'maxes' at ± 10 days; alopecia is normal; extravasation at IV injection site causes severe, protracted ulcers and necrosis. See Chemotherapy, Daunorubicin, Doxorubicin, Idarubicin.

anthracycline

a class of antibiotics isolated from cultures of Streptomyces peucetius; it includes the antineoplastic agents daunomycin and doxorubicin. See also anthracycline antibiotic.
References in periodicals archive ?
The approval was based on recently published clinical efficacy and safety data from the Phase 3, randomized, open-label, controlled study (ET743-SAR-3007), which evaluated YONDELIS versus the chemotherapy agent dacarbazine, in patients with unresectable or metastatic LPS or LMS previously treated with an anthracycline and at least one additional chemotherapy regimen.
Within 12 months of completing anthracycline treatment, 57% of breast cancer patients had changes on their echocardiograms consistent with diastolic dysfunction.
Prior therapy should have included an anthracycline and a taxane in either the adjuvant or metastatic setting unless patients were not suitable for these treatments.
Prior therapy should have included an anthracycline and a taxane unless patients were not suitable for these treatments.
Past clinical trials in younger, healthier women showed improved survival, but also increased heart complications linked to trastuzumab, especially when combined with a frequently used therapy called anthracycline chemotherapy.
Reviewing literature we find that several risk factors have been mentioned for cardiotoxicity of anthracyclines; these risk factors include: the cumulative anthracycline dose, length of post-therapy interval, rate of anthracycline administration, individual anthracycline dose, type of anthracycline, concomitant radiation therapy, concomitant other chemotherapy agents, pre-existing cardiac risk factors, comorbidities, age, sex, and genetic factors [5-12].
Cardiomyopathy which develops with combined use of radiotherapy and anthracycline group medications is one of these problems.
Chemotherapy for treatment-related APL should be no different than for primary APL unless patients have received an anthracycline for their previous cancer.
According to them, despite their resistance to drugs of the anthracycline class, the breast cancers bearing this gene signature will probably still be vulnerable to other types of chemotherapy agents.
Unfortunately, validation studies frequently produce inconsistent findings, perhaps best demonstrated by the continued confusion about the relationship between HER2 status, TOP2A status and benefit from anthracycline chemotherapy.
GEMZAR in combination with paclitaxel is approved by the FDA for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer after they have received another type of chemotherapy called an anthracycline, unless their medical condition did not allow them to receive an anthracycline.
The relative risk of recurrence was reduced by a further 16% with anthracycline regimens, compared with CMF, in women younger than 50, and by 11% in those aged 50-69.