antacid


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

antacid

 [ant-as´id]
1. counteracting acidity.
2. an agent that counteracts acidity; antacids are often used in the treatment of peptic ulcer. Substances that act as antacids include sodium bicarbonate, aluminum hydroxide gel, calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide, magnesium oxide, and magnesium trisilicate.

Since many substances used as medications are weak acids or weak bases, there is a high potential for drug-drug interaction involving antacids. Antacids can form insoluble complexes, interfere with drug absorption, and affect renal excretion of drugs by changing the pH of urine.

In the most commonly used antacids the main active agents are magnesium hydroxide and aluminum hydroxide. Magnesium hydroxide, or “milk of magnesia,” can produce diarrhea. Aluminum hydroxide and calcium carbonate are constipating. It may be necessary to alternate types of antacids when they are taken on a long-term basis. The sodium content varies; some antacids may contain as much as ten times more sodium than others. The sugar content of antacids must also be taken into account, particularly for patients with diabetes mellitus or those on a low-calorie diet. Some have no sugar, whereas others have a considerable amount.

ant·ac·id

(ant-as'id),
1. Neutralizing an acid.
2. Any agent that reduces or neutralizes acidity, as of the gastric juice or any other secretion (for example, calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide).
Synonym(s): antiacid

antacid

/ant·ac·id/ (ant-as´id) counteracting acidity; an agent that so acts.

antacid

(ănt-ăs′ĭd)
adj.
Counteracting or neutralizing acidity, especially of the stomach.
n.
A substance, such as magnesia or sodium bicarbonate, that neutralizes acid.

antacid

[antas′id]
Etymology: Gk, anti, against, acidus, sour
1 opposing acidity.
2 a drug or dietary substance that buffers, neutralizes, or absorbs hydrochloric acid in the stomach. Nonsystemic antacids containing aluminum and calcium are constipating; those containing magnesium have a laxative effect. Systemic antacids such as sodium bicarbonate are rarely used.

antacid

A basic (i.e., pH < 7) agent that neutralises acid in the gastric lumen; the final pH achieved is usually a function of the amount of antacid administered.

GI effects
Antipeptic, increased in acid secretion, increased GI motility, increased mucus secretion; antacids vary in absorption (e.g., NaHCO3 and sodium citrate and are completely absorbed, which may result in metabolic acidosis).

antacid

Pharmacology A basic agent that neutralizes acid in the gastric lumen; the final pH achieved is usually a function of the amount of antacid administered GI effects Antipeptic, ↑ in acid secretion, ↑ GI motility, ↑ mucus secretion; antacids vary in absorption–eg, NaHCO3 and sodium citrate and are completely absorbed, which may result in metabolic acidosis

ant·ac·id

(ant-as'id)
1. Neutralizing an acid.
2. Any agent that reduces or neutralizes acidity, as of the gastric juice or any other secretion.

antacid

A drug used to combat excess stomach acid or to treat the symptom of ACID REFLUX. Antacid drugs are often compounds of magnesium or aluminium. Antacids may also provide a protective coating to the lining of the stomach and DUODENUM.

Antacid

A substance that counteracts or neutralizes acidity, usually of the stomach. Antacids have a rapid onset of action compared to histamine H-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors, but they have a short duration of action and require frequent dosing.

antacid

a substance that neutralizes acidity. Used in alkaline indigestion remedies.

antacid,

n a substance that can counteract or neutralize acidity in the stomach.

ant·ac·id

(ant-as'id)
Any agent that reduces or neutralizes acidity, as of the gastric juice or any other secretion (e.g., calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide).

antacid

1. counteracting acidity.
2. an agent that counteracts acidity. Substances that act as antacids include sodium bicarbonate, aluminum hydroxide gel, magnesium hydroxide, magnesium trisilicate, magnesium oxide and calcium carbonate. They are often used in humans in the treatment of peptic ulcer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Antacids sales reached $505 million, with private label options topping $195 million.
In August, Mylan launched a generic version of Nexium, and Camber Pharmaceuticals released a generic version of the antacid last month.
The company said that Chattem will re-launch Rolaids and expects the antacid to be available at retailers within a year.
3 Additionally patients may be more likely to choose an antacid effective in low volume of doses, palatable, and being cost effective.
If you use Turns or other antacids because some foods don't agree with you--you could be headed for trouble.
But no matter you see as the cause, there's no question that antacids are a big business in this country.
This article for consumers provides general information about antacids.
Some drugs, such as steroids, erythromycin, and salicylates (aspirin derivatives), may actually trigger a sour stomach, which can be effectively eliminated by taking an antacid.
In a retrospective study, continuous enteral feedings were shown to be more effective in reducing stress ulcer formation and clinically significant GI bleeding than a fixed-dose antacid or [H.
s Zantac 150 Antacid tablets had nearly 6% of the tablets market, according to IRI.
They also found that among those who had frequent heartburn, taking antacids reduced the cancer risk by 41%.
M2 PHARMA-January 8, 2013-Sanofi acquires over-the-counter antacid Rolaids, strengthening its consumer healthcare division(C)2013 M2 COMMUNICATIONS