anonymity


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anonymity

 [an″o-nim´ĭ-te]
protection of the subjects in a research study so that their identity cannot be linked with their individual responses, even by the researcher; see also confidentiality.

a·no·n·ym·i·ty

(an'ŏ-nim'i-tē)
Protection of participants in a study or report so that even the researchers or authors cannot link specific respondents with the information provided.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Anonymity was granted to rape suspects under the 1976 Sexual Offences Act, but was removed in 1988 after concerns from police.
Vexed with an overwhelming number of uncivil comments that threaten to undermine the value of their commenting forums, newspapers are increasingly disallowing anonymity by making readers sign in with their Facebook account; 48.
fm insist on anonymity for their users as their big selling point, then advertisers should avoid them like the plague.
In the 1970s, sexual offence defendants were given anonymity and the media was banned from identifying those accused.
Much of this research suggests the effects of GSS anonymity are positive (see, for example, Beauclair, 1987; Connolly et al.
If people use their anonymity or their ability to have an immediate opportunity to express their views, this doesn't mean that we should ban them or even restrict them from using it.
Lady Butler-Sloss, the former president of the High Court's family division who granted Venables anonymity on his release from prison, stressed "the enormous importance of protecting his anonymity now and if he is released because those who wanted to kill him in 2001 are likely to be out there now".
Supporting Mr Straw's position on Venables's anonymity, Lady Butler-Sloss, the former president of the High Court's family division, has stressed: "The enormous importance of protecting his anonymity now and if he is released because those who wanted to kill him in 2001 are likely to be out there now".
Anonymity in court is currently automatic for children.
Warring couples can no longer rely on their children's anonymity as they go through divorce courts, according to Birmingham lawyer Carla MacLeod.
In this study, a web-mediated system was utilized to facilitate peer assessment and provide anonymity minimizing the impact of peer pressure.