anomie

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an·o·mie

(an'ō-mē),
1. Lawlessness; absence or weakening of social norms or values, with corresponding erosion of social cohesion.
2. In psychiatry, absence or weakening of individual norms or values; characterized by anxiety, isolation, and personal disorientation.
[Fr., fr. G. anomia, lawlessness]

anomie

[an′əmē]
a state of apathy, alienation, anxiety, personal disorientation, and distress resulting from the loss of social norms and goals previously valued. Also spelled anomy.

anomie

Neurology
Nominal aphasia, anomic aphasia.
 
Psychiatry
Alienation.
 
Social medicine
Lawlessness; bereft of societal control or unresponsiveness to social norms; e.g., sociopathy.

an·o·mie

(an'ŏ-mē)
Social instability as a result of a loss of accepted standards and values.
[Fr., fr. G. anomia, lawlessness]

anomie

Lack of moral principle, whether in an individual or in a society.

anomie (aˑ·n·mē),

n a sociological phenomenon in which individuals display profound lack of expected social behaviors, often seen when people are uprooted from their places of origin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Guests are hesitating to commit themselves to the idea that crisis situations (value crisis, anomy as a consequence of globalization, socio-economic transition or economic crisis) can be solved by reinforcing national identity formation based on historical identity and understanding one's historical past.
Succinctly, the last balance between both concepts (state and market) giving place to the above anomy is that State should restrict human greed for material values inasmuch these values transgress and disqualify the upper intangible values hierarchy, but at the same time state must also protect and defend human greed when it is not transgressing any value in the above sense; and this makes a subtle difference which up to-day leaves the above anomy still open and debatable.
Wole Soyinka, Season of Anomy (Lon: Rex Collins, 1973), p.
Indeed, Soyinka, like the hero of Season of Anomy, belongs to a generation "born into one long crisis.
On the contrary, it seemed that a form of rural anomy had prevailed in all periods since the Conquest.
Soyinka's novels are The Interpreters (1965), in which a group of young intellectuals function as artists in their talks with one another as they try to place themselves in the context of the world about them, and Season of Anomy, which appeared in 1973.
Maja-Pearce, oddly, does not take issue with Soyinka's bland allegorical conceptualization of Iriyise as "life-force" in Season of Anomy (1973), though, arguably, this is as artistically crude, in its way, as the other fantasy-ridden reductions of women in some of the lesser novels that he discusses.
Feelings of alienation were assessed with the Anomy Scale (McClosky & Schaar, 1965), consisting of 9 agree-disagree items.
The Interpreters (1965) and The Season of Anomy (1974) are novels.
Discusses Soyinka's concept of 'The Fourth Stage', relates it, briefly, to some of his plays where it is, Cormer argues, often linked with death; draws attention to resurrection (Lazarus, for example) and regeneration (Orpheus myth) elements in the novels--where life is important; contrasts the manner in which myth is used in Anomy with the emphasis on interpretation in the earlier novel; points out that Anomy is a playwright's novel 'in which the visual sense is deliberately provoked into supplying important messages'; relates Sekoni to Sango and examines the experience of Lazarus in the context of Christian and Yoruba ideas about death and continuity; examines the significance of the painting of the Pantheon and the complex associations established through it.
In his novels, poetry and drama, Soyinka consistently castigated the incompetence and insensitivity of many influential groups in society, including politicians (Kongi's Harvest, 1965), professionals (The Interpreters [1965]; Season of Anomy, [1973]; The Lion and the Jewel, [1959, 1962]) and the religious hierarchy (The Trials of Brother Jero [1964]; Jero'sMetamorphosis [1963, 1964]).
The general anomy makes himself to build his own universe (the family), which excludes all critics.