anomie


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an·o·mie

(an'ō-mē),
1. Lawlessness; absence or weakening of social norms or values, with corresponding erosion of social cohesion.
2. In psychiatry, absence or weakening of individual norms or values; characterized by anxiety, isolation, and personal disorientation.
[Fr., fr. G. anomia, lawlessness]

anomie

[an′əmē]
a state of apathy, alienation, anxiety, personal disorientation, and distress resulting from the loss of social norms and goals previously valued. Also spelled anomy.

anomie

Neurology
Nominal aphasia, anomic aphasia.
 
Psychiatry
Alienation.
 
Social medicine
Lawlessness; bereft of societal control or unresponsiveness to social norms; e.g., sociopathy.

an·o·mie

(an'ŏ-mē)
Social instability as a result of a loss of accepted standards and values.
[Fr., fr. G. anomia, lawlessness]

anomie

Lack of moral principle, whether in an individual or in a society.

anomie (aˑ·n·mē),

n a sociological phenomenon in which individuals display profound lack of expected social behaviors, often seen when people are uprooted from their places of origin.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main argument is that, contrary to conventional wisdom, neoliberalism and globalization contribute to processes leading to global anomie, dysnomie, and, ultimately, economic misconduct.
In the case of the Toba, the religious movement participates in ethnic reconstruction within a context of generalized anomie.
face pervasive anomie due to their lack of restraints on human desires.
She draws successfully on historical tropes of representation to depict a contemporary world that breeds alienation and anomie.
Their latest project is for a youth club in the small town of Akron where high school drop out rates, drug use and nowhere to go fuel a pervasive spirit of anomie and despair.
concludes, "we find not growing individualism, social anomie, and alienation, but the signs of individual participation in a varied but coherent public religious culture related to the public practice of religion" (118).
Barry Moser's black-and-white wood engravings recall Denslow's graphic brilliance in a very different style and mood: cramped late Puritan anomie, with political intentions (his Wicked Witch resembles Nancy Reagan).
When goals become ill defined, or when they cannot be reached, anomie happens.
Taking Edward Hopper's painting Nighthawks as an inspiration, Judith Jamison's Reminiscin', accompanied by love songs by famous female vocalists, proved an upbeat epilogue to an artwork usually invoking anomie and solitude.
For all the networking that takes place on-line, is there not--as Andrew Holleran wonders in this issue--a profound loneliness and anomie implied by the use of this anonymous, place-free device?
The anomie during and following wars creates a spiritual sickness and longing that we all must find a path through.
Suburbs have been assigned responsibility not merely for social anomie but also for a range of societal ills from gun violence to oil dependence to obesity.