anomic


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Related to anomic: anomic aphasia

anomic

/ano·mic/ (ah-no´mik) lacking a name.

anomic

Amnestic aphasia Neurology Loss of the ability to name objects

anomie

, anomy (an′ŏ-mē) [Fr. from Gr. anomia, lawlessness]
A term coined by the French sociologist Emile Durkheim (1858–1917) to indicate a condition similar to alienation. The individual feels there has been a disintegration of his or her norms and values. Durkheim felt such individuals were prone to take their lives because of the anxiety, isolation, and alienation that they experience.
anomic (ă-nom′ik, ă-nō′mik), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Prison schools as civil spheres, have the potential to combat the nihilistic, distancing anomic culture of the prison (which is anti-restorative, and anti-democratic), because the educational conversation affords students opportunity for involvement in spheres of civility where mutual recognition, new identities and possibilities grounded in hope can prevail.
That is to say, it portrays an increasingly anomic vision of local-level society.
The book tries to hagiographize Thomas, an anomic writer of little renown, beforehand, into death's equivalent of Ring Lardner, the famed sportswriter, or H.
KM stages an encounter between two kinds of Tamils, the first belonging to an upwardly mobile Chennai family and the other to Sri Lanka's militant Tamil separatists, in a coming together that makes the militants less threatening to the former, and less anomic in their anti-statist, territorial passions.
Nonetheless, the accompanying detailed discussions on violence in everyday life--as entertainment, or as anomic expressions of humiliation or stress--communicates the author's grim impressions of our psychological selves.
104) Liu Kang's portrait of contemporary Chinese culture--fragmented, anomic, acquisitive, increasingly individualised--thus represents an appropriate rendition of the diverse cultural palette that has emerged in response to the marketisation and globalisation of China's society.
This symptom is called "anomia" and it should not be confused with the syndrome of anomic aphasia.
Because anomic neighborhoods have widespread crime and disorder and disconnected, frustrated, and fearful residents, they depend on the police for help.
16) Basically, an overemphasis on structural goals, such as financial success and material desires, pave the way for anomic conditions in society.
The erosion over recent decades of vital constitutional and juristic principles has brought us to an anomic state in which the law has lost its intelligibility, certainty and predictability, where the executive government exercises legislative and quasi-judicial powers, the judiciary exercises policymaking powers, where rights effectively turn on opinions about a citizen's purposes, where the principles of impartial enforcement and equality before the law are undermined and where, in a variety of ways, the law is changed at the point of application.