range

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range

 [rānj]
1. the difference between the upper and lower limits of a variable or of a series of values.
2. an interval in which values sampled from a population, or the values in the population itself, are known to lie.
range of accommodation the total amount of accommodative power of the eye; the difference in refractive power of the eye when adjusted for near and for far vision. The amplitude diminishes as age increases because elasticity of the lens is decreased.
range of audibility the range between the extreme frequencies of sound waves beyond which the human ear perceives no sound: lower limit, 16 to 20 cycles per second; upper limit, 18,000 to 20,000 cycles per second.
range of motion the range, measured in degrees of a circle, through which a joint can be extended and flexed; see also range of motion exercises.

range

(rānj),
A statistical measure of the dispersion or variation of values determined by the endpoint values themselves or the difference between them; for example, in a group of children aged 6, 8, 9, 10, 13, and 16 years, the range would be from 6-16 or, alternately, 10 (16 minus 6).
[O.Fr. rang, line, fr. Germanic]

range

(rānj)
1. the difference between the upper and lower limits of a variable or of a series of values.
2. an interval in which values sampled from a population, or the values in the population itself, are known to lie.

range of motion  the range, measured in degrees of a circle, through which a joint can be extended and flexed.
Enlarge picture
Range of motion of the elbow joint.

range

(rānj)
n.
1. The geographic region in which a plant, animal, or other organism normally lives or grows.
2.
a. Mathematics The set of all values a given function may take on.
b. Statistics The difference or interval between the smallest and largest values in a frequency distribution or a set of data.

range

[rānj]
Etymology: OFr, ranger, to arrange in a row
the interval between the lowest and highest values in a series of data.

range

(rānj)
A statistical measure of the dispersion or variation of values determined by the endpoint values themselves or the difference between them; e.g., in a group of children aged 6, 8, 9, 10, 13, and 16, the range would be from 6-16 or, alternately, 10 (16 - 6 years).
[O.Fr. rang, line, fr. Germanic]

range

  1. (of a species) the extent of its distribution.
  2. (in behaviour) the area within which an individual normally lives.

range

(rānj)
Statistical measure of dispersion or variation of values determined by endpoint values themselves or the difference between them.
[O.Fr. rang, line, fr. Germanic]

range,

n a crude measure of dispersion in a distribution; range is computed as the distance from the highest score to the lowest score plus one unit.
range, melting,
n the temperature range from the time an alloy begins to melt until it is completely molten. It varies from 100°F to 200°F (38°C to 70°C), in gold-platinum-palladium alloys.
range of motion,
n the maximum extent to which the parts of a joint can move in extension and flexion as measured in degrees of a circle.

range

1. the difference between the upper and lower limits of a variable or of a series of values.
2. extensive grazing land which provides seasonal feed supply of pasture comprising grasses and clovers and other legumes supplemented by forbs and browse.
3. a husbandry system where animals are permitted to roam free, within reasonable limits, i.e. they are not confined in corrals, lots, yards, houses, barns, byres and the like. Called also free range.
4. animals maintained as in 3 above, e.g. range cattle. Called also range-reared.

annual range
rangeland on which the principal forage plants are self-perpetuating annual herbaceous species.
arid range
lack of sufficient moisture severely limits growth and production of vegetation. Generally considered that this will occur with less than 10 inches (25 cm) of rain in a temperate climate.
range of audibility
the range between the extreme frequencies of sound waves beyond which the ear of each species perceives no sound.
range cubes
large pellets of compacted feed, between a pellet and a log, approximately 1 inch cubed, used to feed animals at pasture. Can be fed on the ground with very little loss.
free range
see (3) (above).
range goldenrod
solidagomollis.
range of motion
the range, measured in degrees of a circle, through which a joint can be extended and flexed. See also range of motion exercises (below).
range of motion exercises
exercises calculated to extend the range of extension and flexion of an impaired joint.
range paralysis
range-reared
see range (3 above).
range stiffness
a disease of lambs. See bluetongue.

Patient discussion about range

Q. what is a safe tumor marker number range?

A. depends on the marker...most of the markers are materials that found normally in our body. and there are a number of markers and their levels differentiate. what marker do you mean?

Q. does anyone know the range for childrens blood sugar?

A. The range for children's blood sugar level is quite similar to that of adults, and should be below 126 mg/dl after a 12 hour fast, or under 200 mg/dl on a random testing. 2 following testings that show pathologic results define diabetes.

Q. How do I gain range of motion after shoulder surgery I'm 31 years old and had a shoulder replacment last year. I still don't know why my joint gave out and 4 Orthopedic Surgeons couldn't tell me either. I have limited Range of Motion and the Dr. seems to think that because of my "age" I was less likley to get full range back. I refuse to believe that, does anyone have any suggestions on how to gain ROM back?

A. i guess you go to physiotherapy no?
that is their job. to give you range of motion after injuries, surgeries ect. they'll give you exercises specially for your condition. when i had an accident i broke my leg hip and i needed 2 months of physiotherapy that helped very much.

More discussions about range
References in periodicals archive ?
The debt of domestic nonfinancial sectors grew 5 1/2 percent at an annual rate from the fourth quarter of 1994 through May of this year - a modest pickup over the pace of recent years but well within its annual range of 3 to 7 percent.
Debt growth, which has moved in closer alignment with nominal income over the past few years than have the monetary aggregates, will again be monitored in light of a 4 percent to 8 percent annual range.
Gales offers a tailored exit strategy or management continuity strategy in exchange for qualified acquisitions, and targets technically superior organizations in the $15-100 million annual range.
For the foreseeable future, cash flow from operations is expected to be sufficient to meet net stock repurchases in an annual range of $300 million and capital requirements, including the plan to update the existing store base.
While M2 growth on a quarterly average basis was expected to be stronger in the current quarter than in the previous two quarters, expansion for the year as a whole was still projected to fall a little below the Committee's annual range.
93 ranks in the 87th percentile of its annual range, 10 of the 16 analysts covering the shares rate them a "hold" or worse, and short interest would take nearly four days to buy back.
For the foreseeable future, cash flow from operations is expected to be sufficient to meet capital requirements and net stock repurchases in an annual range of $150-200 million.
Although demands for credit by the federal government have been heavy, growth in the debt of other sectors has been lethargic, and, as a result, the total debt aggregate has remained around the lower bound of its annual range throughout much of 1992.
50 and a ranking in the middle of its annual range, complacency is king in the options pits for INTC.
With its major capacity expansion essentially completed, capital spending over the near term is forecast at approximately $250 million annually, compared with outlays in the $500 million annual range in recent years.
While the relationship between money growth and economic activity was subject to substantial uncertainty in the short run, they saw a marked advantage, in terms of the continuity of monetary policy and its credibility, for the Committee to more aggressively foster growth of M2 within the annual range.

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