ankylosis


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Related to ankylosis: fibrous ankylosis

ankylosis

 [ang″kĭ-lo´sis] (pl. ankylo´ses) (Gr.)
immobility and consolidation of a joint due to disease, injury, or surgical procedure. adj., adj ankylot´ic. Ankylosis may be caused by destruction of the membranes that line the joint or by faulty bone structure. It is most often a result of chronic rheumatoid arthritis, in which the affected joint tends to assume the least painful position and may become more or less permanently fixed in it. Other causes include infection and traumatic injury to the joint. Artificial ankylosis (arthrodesis), fusion of a joint by surgical operation, is sometimes done to ameliorate the pain experienced in a severe joint condition.
bony ankylosis union of the bones of a joint by loss of articular cartilage, resulting in complete immobility.
extracapsular ankylosis that caused by rigidity of surrounding parts.
false ankylosis (fibrous ankylosis) reduced joint mobility due to proliferation of fibrous tissue.
intracapsular ankylosis that caused by rigidity of structures within the joint.
spurious ankylosis extracapsular ankylosis.
stapedial ankylosis fixation of the footplate of the stapes in otosclerosis, causing conductive hearing loss.
true ankylosis bony ankylosis.

an·ky·lo·sis

(ang'ki-lō'sis), Do not confuse this word with alkalosis.
Stiffening or fixation of a joint as the result of a disease process, with fibrous or bony union across the joint; fusion.
[G. ankylōsis, stiffening of a joint]

ankylosis

/an·ky·lo·sis/ (ang″kĭ-lo´sis) pl. ankylo´ses   [Gr.] immobility and consolidation of a joint due to disease, injury, or surgical procedure.ankylot´ic
artificial ankylosis  arthrodesis.
bony ankylosis  union of the bones of a joint by proliferation of bone cells, resulting in complete immobility; true a.
extracapsular ankylosis  that due to rigidity of structures outside the joint capsule.
false ankylosis  fibrous a.
fibrous ankylosis  reduced joint mobility due to proliferation of fibrous tissue.
intracapsular ankylosis  that due to disease, injury, or surgery within the joint capsule.

ankylosis

also

anchylosis

(ăng′kə-lō′sĭs)
n.
1. The consolidation of bones or their parts to form a single unit.
2. The stiffening and immobility of a joint as the result of disease, trauma, surgery, or abnormal bone fusion.

an′ky·lot′ic (-lŏt′ĭk) adj.

ankylosis

[ang′kilō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, ankylosis, bent condition
1 the fusion of a joint, often in an abnormal position, usually resulting from destruction of articular cartilage and subchondral bone, as occurs in rheumatoid arthritis. It may also occur in immobilized patients when active or passive range of motion is not provided. Also called true ankylosis. See also acampsia.
2 the surgically induced fusion of a joint to relieve pain or provide support. Also called arthrodesis, fusion. ankylosed, adj.

ankylosis

Orthopedics A fusion of bones across a joint, which may be a complication of chronic inflammation. See Ankylosing spondylitis.

an·ky·lo·sis

(ang'ki-lō'sis)
1. Stiffening or fixation of a joint as the result of a disease process, with fibrous or bony union across the joint.
2. dentistry Fusion of the tooth with the alveolar process.
[G. ankylōsis, stiffening of a joint]

ankylosis

Fixation and immobilization of a joint by disease which has so damaged the bearing surfaces that the bone ends have been able to fuse permanently together. Sometimes ankylosis is deliberately performed, as a surgical procedure, to relieve pain. From the Greek ankylos , bent.

ankylosis

stiffness or fixation of a joint caused by disease affecting the articulating surfaces.

ankylosis

joint stiffening or fixation due to fibrous or bone union preventing articulation

an·ky·lo·sis

(ang'ki-lō'sis)
Bony union of the radicular surface of a tooth to the surrounding alveolar bone in an area of previous partial root resorption.
[G. ankylōsis, stiffening of a joint]

ankylosis (ang´kilō´sis),

n an abnormal fixation and immobility of a joint.
ankylosis, bony,
n a joining of bone with tooth or bone with bone that causes total loss of movement. See also tooth, ankylosed.
ankylosis, false,
n an inability to open the oral cavity because of trismus rather than disease of the joint.
ankylosis, fibrous,
n the fixation of a joint by fibrous tissue.
ankylosis of tooth,

ankylosis

abnormal immobility and consolidation of a joint.
Ankylosis may be caused by destruction of the membranes that line the joint or by faulty bone structure. It is most often a result of chronic arthritis, in which the affected joint tends to assume the least painful position and may become more or less permanently fixed in it.
Artificial ankylosis (arthrodesis), locking of a joint by surgical operation, is sometimes done in treatment of a severe joint condition.

bony ankylosis
union of the bones of a joint by proliferation of bone cells, resulting in complete immobility.
extracapsular ankylosis
that caused by rigidity of surrounding parts.
false ankylosis, fibrous ankylosis
reduced joint mobility due to proliferation of fibrous tissue.
inherited multiple ankylosis
calves are affected at birth and cause fetal dystocia. The legs are bent and fixed in flexion, and there is some deformity of the spine. In one breed of cattle there is a combination of ankylosis and cleft palate.
intracapsular ankylosis
that caused by rigidity of structures within the joint.
spontaneous ankylosis
occurs in the intertarsal and tarsometatarsal joints of horses. Called also bone spavin.
spurious ankylosis
extracapsular ankylosis.
stapedial ankylosis
fixation of the footplate of the stapes in otosclerosis, causing a conductive hearing loss.
surgical ankylosis
performed to immobilize a painful joint or to correct excessive mobility, e.g. carpal ankylosis carried out on large birds as a deflighting procedure.
true ankylosis
bony ankylosis.

Patient discussion about ankylosis

Q. Is ankylosing spondylitis genetically inherited?

A. It is known today that ankylosing spondylitis (spondyloarthritis) has a very strong genetic connection. It is not a disease inhertited by a single gene that is dominant, but certainly there is genetic predisposition in families (and a more detailed information- about 90% of the patients express the HLA-B27 genotype).

Q. I have had ankylosing spondilitis for over 25 years. What is available at this point to mitigate the effects?

A. The mainstay of the treatment severe ankylosing spondylitis today are "anti-TNF", drugs that affect the immune system through blocking the action of a protein called TNF.

Other optional treatments include sulfasalazine and thalidomide.
Of course, all these treatments require prescription and consultation with a doctor (in this case usually rheumatologist).

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ankylosingspondylitis.html

More discussions about ankylosis
References in periodicals archive ?
In this case, joint function was preserved for up to 3 months after surgery before eventual ankylosis.
A CT scan confirmed the above observations and showed complete circumferential ankylosis with an absence of osteolysis around the TKA with a posterior joint fusion (Figures 2 and 3).
Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis affects joint movement, speech, mastication, and oral hygiene.
In relation to the respiratory parameters obtained by means of spirometry examinations, namely the vital capacity, maximum expiratory volume per second and calculation of bronchial permeability index based on them, I noticed an increase in these volumes at the final examination, compared to the initial examination, and thus a reduction of the restrictive respiratory syndrome due to the ankylosis of the thoracic cavity joints, as well as of the hypotrophy and atrophy of main and accessory respiratory muscles, with impact on the diaphragmatic movements, were found.
8) Further, it is rare to find an extensive myositis ossificans of the hip following head injury leading to extra-articular ankylosis.
Perosomus elumbis (Acaudatus) is an occasionally found congenital anomaly characterized by partial or complete agenesis of lumbar sacral and coccygeal vertebrae and ankylosis of the hind limbs.
5%), breech presentation with deformity or ankylosis of hindlimbs (12.
Sanu, Oluwatosin O, Tooth Ankylosis And Its Orthodontic Implications, Pakistan Oral & Dental Journal Vol 28, No.
The calves had severe arthrogryposis, ankylosis of several joints, abnormal curvature of the vertebral column, and severe muscle atrophy.
Severe or long-standing spasticity may lead to contractures and joint ankylosis, which can severely restrict the patient's care and rehabilitation [9].
Some changes that may affect the tooth fragment such as pulp calcification, ankylosis, external and internal resorptions may be found in follow-up examinations (Andreasen & Andreasen 1994, Davidovich et al.
Due to the ankylosis of both upper limbs, the patient had slight difficulty maintaining his body balance.