ankle-brachial index


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Related to ankle-brachial index: claudication, endarterectomy

ankle-brachial index (ABI),

objective measurement of arterial insufficiency based on the ratio of ankle systolic pressure to brachial systolic pressure. An ABI of 1.0 indicates absence of arterial insufficiency; an ABI of less than 0.50 indicates severe arterial insufficiency.

ankle-brachial index (ABI)

the ratio of ankle systolic pressure to the arm systolic pressure, used in assessing the status of lower extremity arteries. It is calculated by dividing the higher of the left and right ankle pressures by the higher of the two brachial artery pressures. Also called ankle-arm index.

ankle-brachial index

The ankle-to-arm ratio of systolic blood pressure, which is useful in diagnosing peripheral arterial disease.

an·kle-bra·chi·al in·dex

(ABI) (ang'kel-brā'kē-ăl in'deks)
Objective measurement of arterial insufficiency based on the ratio of ankle systolic pressure to brachial systolic pressure. An ABI of 1.0 indicates absence of arterial insufficiency; an ABI of less than 0.50 indicates severe arterial insufficiency.
Synonym(s): ankle-arm index.

ankle-brachial index

; ABI; ankle-brachial pressure index; ABPI the numerical ratio (A/B) of the systolic blood pressures at the ankle (A) and the arm (B) (Table 1)
Table 1: Interpreting ankle brachial (A/B) indices
Systolic pressure ratio (A/B)Interpretation
0.9-1.1Normal
0.5-0.9Arterial compromise/impaired arterial supply to lower leg/foot; patient may report claudication
<0.5Severe arterial supply/frank ischaemia of lower leg and foot; patient may report rest pain
0.1-0.2Impending/frank ischaemic gangrene
> 1.1Incompressible leg artery due to MÖnckeberg's sclerosis; compromised arterial supply to lower leg and foot
References in periodicals archive ?
Sensitivity and specificity of the ankle-brachial index to diagnose peripheral artery disease: a structured review Vascular Medicine, 15(5); 361 -369.
The ankle-brachial index in the elderly and risk of stroke, coronary disease, and death: the Framingham Study.
2] 26 (24-29) Current smoking (d) 107 (50%) Arterial hypertension 120 (56%) Diabetes mellitus 84 (39%) Coronary artery disease 67 (32%) Cerebrovascular disease 35 (16%) Carotid stenosis [greater than or equal to]50% 55 (26%) Resting ankle-brachial index, mmHg/mmHg 0.
In the study, 6,880 unselected patients aged 65 years and older were screened for PAD by their primary care physician using measurement of the ankle-brachial index (ABI).
CHICAGO -- The Framingham Risk Score failed to identify a substantial number of people who were at risk for cardiovascular disease events on the basis of their ankle-brachial index, in a review of more than 1,700 asymptomatic people.
No patients had major amputations, and ankle-brachial index (ABI) scores remained significantly improved (p<0.
Scientists defined PAD symptoms when claudication was present (characteristic muscle cramping in the lower extremities during exertion) with an ankle-brachial index (ABI) of less than 0.
PAD was identified in people who had an ankle-brachial index of less than 0.
This inexpensive test known as the ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a cost-effective method to detect disease in asymptomatic patients.
Prevalence of Abnormal Ankle-brachial Index (ABI) Test High Among Patients Who Are Otherwise Not Considered at Risk of Coronary Heart Disease by Framingham Risk Score
This finding from the large national German Epidemiological Trial on Ankle-Brachial Index (getABI) contains a key message for primary care medicine: The only way most such asymptomatic high-risk individuals are likely to be identified and placed on preventive therapy in a timely way is through systematic screening for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) carried out when they visit their primary care physician for some other reason, said Dr.