ankle-brachial index


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Related to ankle-brachial index: claudication, endarterectomy

ankle-brachial index (ABI),

objective measurement of arterial insufficiency based on the ratio of ankle systolic pressure to brachial systolic pressure. An ABI of 1.0 indicates absence of arterial insufficiency; an ABI of less than 0.50 indicates severe arterial insufficiency.

ankle-brachial index (ABI)

the ratio of ankle systolic pressure to the arm systolic pressure, used in assessing the status of lower extremity arteries. It is calculated by dividing the higher of the left and right ankle pressures by the higher of the two brachial artery pressures. Also called ankle-arm index.

ankle-brachial index

The ankle-to-arm ratio of systolic blood pressure, which is useful in diagnosing peripheral arterial disease.

an·kle-bra·chi·al in·dex

(ABI) (ang'kel-brā'kē-ăl in'deks)
Objective measurement of arterial insufficiency based on the ratio of ankle systolic pressure to brachial systolic pressure. An ABI of 1.0 indicates absence of arterial insufficiency; an ABI of less than 0.50 indicates severe arterial insufficiency.
Synonym(s): ankle-arm index.

ankle-brachial index

; ABI; ankle-brachial pressure index; ABPI the numerical ratio (A/B) of the systolic blood pressures at the ankle (A) and the arm (B) (Table 1)
Table 1: Interpreting ankle brachial (A/B) indices
Systolic pressure ratio (A/B)Interpretation
0.9-1.1Normal
0.5-0.9Arterial compromise/impaired arterial supply to lower leg/foot; patient may report claudication
<0.5Severe arterial supply/frank ischaemia of lower leg and foot; patient may report rest pain
0.1-0.2Impending/frank ischaemic gangrene
> 1.1Incompressible leg artery due to MÖnckeberg's sclerosis; compromised arterial supply to lower leg and foot
References in periodicals archive ?
Residential exposure to urban air pollution, ankle-brachial index, and peripheral arterial disease.
Ankle-brachial index for assessment of peripheral arterial disease.
All diabetic patients over 50 years of age should be screened for peripheral arterial disease using the ankle-brachial index, the American Diabetes Association has recommended.
Secondary endpoints include Pain Free Walking Distance, Resting Pain, Ankle-Brachial Index, NSS/NIS survey and Quality of Life assessments.
We urge readers who experience leg or hip pain when walking to ask their doctors about an ankle-brachial index test.
This inexpensive test, known as the ankle-brachial index (ABI), is a cost-effective method to detect disease in asymptomatic patients.
Objective: To use ankle-brachial index (ABI) to evaluate the prevalence of PAD and to identify the associated risk factors and their level of control in patients with diabetes mellitus.
To help confirm a diagnosis of PAD, a vascular specialist may run a simple, non-invasive test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI).
Evans, as well as the AHA and the American College of Cardiology, recommend that all adults age 65 and older, and those age 50 and older with diabetes or a history of tobacco use, undergo screening for PAD with the ankle-brachial index (ABI).
These increases were independent of the small changes in blood pressure and ankle-brachial index associated with the drug.
The patients were offered routine ankle-brachial index studies to gauge improvement in blood flow, and followed by ultrasound.
Defining PAD by measurement of ABI is most accurate (7) and determination of ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a simple noninvasive procedure that can easily be performed in the outpatient setting (8).