band

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Related to anisotropic band: H band

band

 [band]
1. a part, structure, or appliance that binds; for anatomical structures, see frenulum, tenia, trabecula, and vinculum.
2. in dentistry, a thin metal strip fitted around a tooth or its roots.
3. in histology, a zone of a myofibril of striated muscle.
4. in cytogenetics, a segment of a chromosome stained brighter or darker than the adjacent bands; used in identifying the chromosomes and in determining the exact extent of chromosomal abnormalities. Called Q-bands, G-bands, C-bands, T-bands, etc., according to the staining method used. See also layer, stria, and stripe.
A band the dark-staining zone of a sarcomere, whose center is traversed by the H band.
H band a pale zone sometimes seen traversing the center of the A band of a striated myofibril.
I band the band within a striated myofibril, seen as a light region under the light microscope and as a dark region under polarized light.
M band the narrow dark band in the center of the H band.
matrix band a cylindrical metal band with a special clamp or holder (the matrix retainer); it is filled with softened impression compound and seated over a tooth so that the compound flows into the prepared cavity and an impression of the tooth can be obtained. It is also used for placement and contouring of certain restorative materials.
orthodontic band a band fitted over a tooth to anchor an orthodontic fixed appliance.
Z band a thin membrane in a myofibril, seen on longitudinal section as a dark line in the center of the I band; the distance between Z bands delimits the sarcomeres of striated muscle.

band

(band),
1. Any appliance or part of an apparatus that encircles or binds a part of the body.
See also: zone.
2. Any ribbon-shaped or cordlike anatomic structure that encircles or binds another structure or that connects two or more parts.
3. A narrow strip containing one or more macromolecules (on occasion, small molecules) detected in electrophoresis or certain types of chromatography.
4. A narrow range of wavelength in an electromagnetic spectrum.
5. A zone of macromolecules in experiments involving centrifugation.

band

(band)
1. a part, structure, or appliance that binds; for anatomical structures, see frenulum, tenia, trabecula, and vinculum.
2. in dentistry, a thin metal strip fitted around a tooth or its roots.
3. in histology, a zone of a myofibril of striated muscle.
4. in cytogenetics, a segment of a chromosome stained brighter or darker than the adjacent bands; used in identifying the chromosomes and in determining the exact extent of chromosomal abnormalities. Called Q-b's, G-b's, C-b's, T-b's, etc., according to the staining method used.

A band  the dark-staining zone of a sarcomere, whose center is traversed by the H band.
band of Broca  a band of nerve fibers that forms the caudal zone of the anterior perforated substance where it adjoins the optic tract.
H band  a pale zone sometimes seen traversing the center of the A band of a striated myofibril.
I band  the band within a striated myofibril, seen as a light region under the light microscope and as a dark region under polarized light.
iliotibial band  see under tract.
M band  the narrow dark band in the center of the H band.
matrix band  a thin piece of metal fitted around a tooth to supply a missing wall of a multisurface cavity to allow adequate condensation of amalgam into the cavity.
oligoclonal bands  discrete bands of immunoglobulins with decreased electrophoretic mobility whose presence in the cerebrospinal fluid may be indicative of multiple sclerosis or other disease of the central nervous system.
Z band  a thin membrane in a myofibril, seen on longitudinal section as a dark line in the center of the I band; the distance between Z bands delimits the sarcomeres of striated muscle.

band

(bănd)
n.
1. A strip or stripe that contrasts with something else in color, texture, or material.
2.
a. Biology A chromatically, structurally, or functionally differentiated strip or stripe in or on an organism.
b. Anatomy A cordlike tissue that connects or holds structures together.

band

Etymology: ME, bande, strip
1 (in anatomy) a bundle of fibers, as seen in tendon or striated muscle, that encircles a structure or binds one part of the body to another.
2 (in dentistry) a strip of metal that fits around a tooth and serves as an attachment for orthodontic components. Also called stab form.
3
Usage notes: (informal)
the immature form of a segmented neutrophil characterized by a sausage-shaped nucleus. It is the only immature leukocyte normally found in the peripheral circulation. Bands represent 3% to 5% of the total white cell number. An increase in the relative number of bands indicates bacterial infection or acute stress to the bone marrow.

band

Anatomy
A broad sheet of fibrotendinous tissue.
 
Haematology
(1) (Band cell, band form, band neutrophil, stab cell). An immature neutrophil with a nucleus lacking the segmentation typical of mature PMNs, having one continuous nuclear membrane “band”; > 5% bands in the peripheral blood implies increased PMN production in the BM, which is often associated with acute infection. See Left shift, PMN.
(2) A region on an SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis of “ghosts”—membranes devoid of Hb of RBCs—when subjected to a hypoosmolar (low-ionic strength) solution. Electrophoresis divides the membrane into: bands 1 and 2 (spectrins); bands 2.1 and 2.2 (ankyrin); band 3 (a 90-kD glycoprotein dimer that forms part of the erythrocyte ion channel involved in anion transport); band 4.5 (a glucose transporter); and band 5 (actin).
 
Informatics
See Broadband, ISM band.

Lab medicine
An aggregate of a particular protein or group of proteins on an electrophoresis of serum protein.
 
Medspeak-UK
noun A salary level paid to a certain group of workers (at the NHS, UK) for performing a type of job.
 
verb To determine the salary of a particular person.

Molecular biology
Any “spot” on an electrophoretic gel, which corresponds to the distance of migration of a molecule of interest (DNA, RNA or protein).
 
Vox populi
See Armband.

band

Lab medicine An aggregate of a particular protein or group of proteins on an electrophoresis of serum protein

band

(band)
1. Any appliance or part of an apparatus that encircles or binds a part of the body.
See also: zone
2. Any ribbon-shaped or cordlike anatomic structure that encircles or binds another structure or that connects two or more parts.
See: fascia, line, linea, stria, tenia
3. A narrow strip containing one or more macromolecules (on occasion, small molecules) detected in electrophoresis or certain types of chromatography.
4. dentistry A strip of metal that fits around a tooth and serves as an attachment for orthodontic components.
5. orthodontics Part of an appliance used to align teeth.
6. A nonfilamentous neutrophil.

band

  1. in ELECTROPHORESIS, a concentration, at a particular location in a gel, of MOLECULES of a similar mobility determined by size and/or shape and/or net charge. The band can be made visible by staining, FLUORESCENCE, autoradiography (see AUTORADIOGRAPH and other techniques.
  2. in CENTRIFUGATION, a concentrated deposition, at a particular position in a gradient, of molecules of the same size and/or shape and/or density.
  3. an element of the pattern produced when mitotic CHROMOSOMES are suitably stained, for example with Giemsa (see C-BANDING). Chromosome pairs have unique banding patterns, which can be used for identification. The bands can be numbered and may be used for mapping the position of genes. The banding pattern can also be used to determine whether chromosomes have undergone structural rearrangements. Polytene chromosomes (see SALIVARY GLAND CHROMOSOME have a unique pattern of bands and interbands. The banding pattern is due to the differential folding of the CHROMATIN fibres that make up the chromosome. They are more tightly folded in the band regions than in the interband regions.
  4. an element of the pattern in sections of MUSCLE myofibrils, where dark areas (A-BANDS) can be seen alternating with light areas (I-BANDS).

Band

Immature neutrophil.

band

(band)
1. Any appliance or part of an apparatus that encircles or binds a part of the body or body structure.
See also: zone
2. Any ribbon-shaped or cordlike anatomic structure that encircles or binds another structure or connects two or more parts.

band,

n 1. a cord, tie, chain, or metal collar by which something is bound.
n 2. a contrasting strip or strip of material running through or along the edge of a material.
band adapter,
band, adjustable orthodontic,
n a band provided with an adjusting screw to permit alteration in size.
band, apron,
band, orthodontic,
n a thin metal ring, usually stainless steel, that secures orthodontic attachments to a tooth. The band, with orthodontic attachments welded or soldered to it, is closely adapted to fit the contours of the tooth and then is cemented into place.
band, pusher,
n an instrument used to adapt the metal band to the tooth.
band remover,
n an instrument used to remove bands from the teeth.
band, rubber,
n See elastic.
band, slip,
n a band formed when a metal is placed under a load and one grain tends to slip or slide on another.
band, striated

band

1. a part, structure or appliance that binds.
2. in histology, a zone of a myofibril of striated muscle.
3. in cytogenetics, a segment of a chromosome stained brighter or darker than the adjacent bands; used in identifying the chromosomes and in determining the exact extent of chromosomal abnormalities. Called Q-bands, G-bands, C-bands, T-bands, etc., according to the staining method used.
3. an American term for a group of range sheep, usually about 1,000, that is ranged by a single herder.

band form
an immature polymorphonuclear leukocyte. See also shift to the left.

Patient discussion about band

Q. how bad can your headaches get the ones i get feel like a band around my head and my eyes ache.

A. Headache can be very painful; thankfully, headache chronic syndromes can be diagnosed and treated quite effectively. From your description it sounds like you have a well-known headache syndrome (maybe cluster headache). However, effective diagnosis and treatment aren't possible over the net, so I would suggest seeing a doctor in order to treat it.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/headache.html

More discussions about band