anisocoria


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Related to anisocoria: Horner's syndrome, physiologic anisocoria

anisocoria

 [an-i″so-kor´e-ah]
inequality in size of the pupils of the eyes.

an·i·so·co·ri·a

(an-ī'sō-kō'rē-ă), [MIM*106240]
A condition in which the two pupils are not of equal size.
[aniso- + G. korē, pupil]

anisocoria

/an·iso·co·ria/ (-kor´e-ah) inequality in size of the pupils of the eyes.

anisocoria

[-kôr′ē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, anisos, unequal, kore, pupil
an inequality of the diameter of the pupils of the two eyes.
enlarge picture
Anisocoria

an·i·so·co·ri·a

(an-ī'sō-kōr'ē-ă)
A condition in which the two pupils are not of equal size.
[aniso- + G. korē, pupil]

anisocoria

Inequality in the size of the pupils of the eye.

anisocoria 

Condition in which the pupils of the eyes are not of equal size. Typically one pupil is abnormal and cannot either dilate or constrict. It may be physiological (e.g. in antimetropia) or it may be part of a syndrome, the most common being those of Adie's and Horner's. Physiological anisocoria remains constant irrespective of the level of illumination. Anisocoria can occur as a result of injury (e.g. to the iris sphincter muscle), inflammation (e.g. iridocyclitis), diseases of the iris, paralysis of the third nerve, angle-closure glaucoma, systemic diseases (e.g. diabetes, syphilis) or accidental drug instillation into the eye (if the drug or substance has anticholinergic properties the condition is then referred to as anticholinergic mydriasis or 'atropine' mydriasis). The search for the cause of anisocoria is facilitated by testing the pupil light reflexes and responses to locally instilled drugs (Fig. A14). See efferent pupillary defect; pupil light reflex; pupillometer.
Fig. A14 Anisocoriaenlarge picture
Fig. A14 Anisocoria

anisocoria

unequal or asymmetric pupils.

prechiasmal anisocoria
mydriasis caused by disorders of the retina or optic nerve.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ipratropium-bromide-induced acute anisocoria in the intensive care setting due to ill-fitting facemasks.
This report highlights the importance of a systematic approach to the evaluation of anisocoria and sensitises physicians to the phenomenon of potentiation of the beta adrenergic mydriatic effect of the commonly used nebulisers.
Anisocoria is the most common pupil abnormality and refers to unequal pupil sizes.
I therefore propose an amended flow chart for anisocorias (Fig.
Diameter = 4mm (R+L) B Physiological anisocoria eg pupils round, reactive to light (D+C) and accommodation.
Although there have been some reports that apraclonidine can reverse anisocoria, (2) no significant change occurred in our patient.
a There is a degree of anisocoria between these two eyes
Before starting ocular motility, note any characteristic head posture, ptosis or anisocoria as key signs of possible neurological damage.
Where anisocoria is suspected, it is important to ask the patient if they are aware of this and if they have any associated symptoms (visual or neurological), since this can provide a clue to the cause; for example headache, numbness, blurred vision or visual field loss (possible orbital apex tumour), transient visual loss (internal carotid artery dissection) or diplopia (possible partial third nerve palsy).
Associated decreased corneal or facial sensation or the presence of anisocoria, increases the risk of a tumour.
The pupil can be affected by aneurysm compression of the oculomotor (IIIrd) nerve, for example at the junction of the internal carotid artery and the posterior communicating artery, resulting in a small degree of anisocoria (1mm or less).
Most cases of acquired anisocoria are due to a problem with the eye itself, such as childhood uveitis or Adie's pupil.