animism

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an·i·mism

(an'i-mizm),
The view that all things in nature, both animate and inanimate, contain a spirit or soul; part of many religious doctrines that a soul or spirit dwells within people and nature.
See also: animatism.
[L. anima, soul]

animism

A term of historic interest for belief that inanimate objects (e.g., earth, wind, fire, et al) are alive, move with purpose and intent, and have an agenda. The current equivalent is the Gaia hypothesis, which is widely regarded by mainstream biologists as a form of pseudoscience.

animism

(an′ĭ-mizm) [ anima + -ism]
Attribution of spiritual qualities and mental capabilities to nonhuman living creatures, e.g., animals or trees, or to inanimate objects, e.g., mountains.

animism

The belief held by many primitive peoples that a spirit resides within every object, controlling its existence and influencing events in the natural world.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lawrence's animistic imagery dramatizes the way that erotic feeling transforms perception.
Or again, |we might consider [the Anglo-Saxons] as possessed of animistic beliefs'.
Moreover, some aspects of the Taino animistic and material culture have been interwoven into the Euro-African fabric of the islands' folk universe (Ibid.
While Rose's dark and poetic work is undeniably riveting, the flat ontology immanent to its seductive alloy of the technological and biological provokes questions as to what might be lost, perhaps too readily, in contamination-a question that seems no less pertinent to David Douard's animistic installation combining two works, So' Suckle to Mom and So' Suckle to Gro, both 2014, in which these registers fuse and part uncannily.
Nevertheless, the study of animistic concepts and worldviews is still in its infancy.
Some specific topics include practice-based research as part of the creative process, and questioning identity between Western contemporary reality and Siberian animistic reality.
But if we are willing to take into account the place of nature in the animistic metaphysics of the Yoruba, as well as how the poet rhapsodizes even idealities such as Ogun, Obatala, Sango, Osun, and Esu-Elegbara, we are then forced to draw the conclusion that Osundare is no less a worshipper of nature than Wordsworth, and, more importantly, no less animist-minded than his elder compatriot Soyinka.
Their rituals are a combination of Buddhistic, animistic, and Brahmanical elements.
Before Galileo and Francis Bacon brought the scientific method onto the global stage in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, animistic and supernatural views of the universe, spawned in the infancy of our species, were predominant.
She traces a route from early animistic beliefs through Christianity to modern science, a trajectory that leaves people cut off from the idea of nature as alive and mythologically significant.
Rather, it is precisely the expression of Guareschi's Christianity, an ideology given animistic voice in the talking crucifix and requiring constant defensive restatement, that determines the writer's lack of ambition.