animals


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an·i·mals

zoophobia.
References in classic literature ?
So long as visible or audible pain turns you sick; so long as your own pains drive you; so long as pain underlies your propositions about sin,--so long, I tell you, you are an animal, thinking a little less obscurely what an animal feels.
The thing before you is no longer an animal, a fellow-creature, but a problem
The animal gave a terrible cry, but went on faster than ever.
The situation was thus rendered really very alarming; the anchor-rope, which had securely caught, could not be disengaged, nor could it yet be cut by the knives of our aeronauts, and the balloon was rushing headlong toward the wood, when the animal received a ball in the eye just as he lifted his head.
He had strengthened the window protections and fitted a unique wooden lock to the cabin door, so that when he hunted for game and fruits, as it was constantly necessary for him to do to insure sustenance, he had no fear that any animal could break into the little home.
Together they watched the strange animal that had pursued them for days and that had already accomplished the destruction of half their dog-team.
In animals it has a more marked effect; for instance, I find in the domestic duck that the bones of the wing weigh less and the bones of the leg more, in proportion to the whole skeleton, than do the same bones in the wild-duck; and I presume that this change may be safely attributed to the domestic duck flying much less, and walking more, than its wild parent.
These animals are easily killed in numbers; but their skins are of trifling value, and the meat is very indifferent.
O mine animals, answered Zarathustra, talk on thus and let me listen
We know a great many things concerning ourselves which we cannot know nearly so directly concerning animals or even other people.
Ay, let me see the heart--it will at once determine the character of the animal-- certes this is not the cor--ay, sure enough it is--the animal must be of the order belluae, from its obese habits
A man and an ox are both 'animal', and these are univocally so named, inasmuch as not only the name, but also the definition, is the same in both cases: for if a man should state in what sense each is an animal, the statement in the one case would be identical with that in the other.