aniline

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Related to anilin: phenylamine, phenol

aniline

 [an´ĭ-lin]
an oily liquid from coal tar and indigo or prepared by reducing nitrobenzene; the parent substance of colors or dyes derived from coal tar. Aniline and its derivatives are an important cause of serious industrial poisoning. Household items such as indelible ink, shoe dye, and some wax crayons have been associated with poisonings. Routes of exposure include the respiratory tract, the mouth, and percutaneous absorption. Aniline from the mother can cross the placental barrier to poison a fetus. The predominant acute toxic effect is methemoglobinemia.

an·i·line

(an'i-lin, -lēn),
An oily, colorless, or brownish liquid, of aromatic odor and acrid taste, which is the parent substance of many synthetic dyes; derived from benzene by the substitution of the group -NH2 for one of the hydrogen atoms. Aniline is highly toxic, may cause industrial poisoning, and may be carcinogenic.
[Ar. an-nil, indigo]

aniline

/an·i·line/ (an´ĭ-lin) the parent substance of colors or dyes derived from coal tar; it is an important cause of serious industrial poisoning associated with bone marrow depression as well as methemoglobinemia, and high doses or prolonged exposure may be carcinogenic.

aniline (C6H5NH2)

[an′ilēn]
Etymology: Ar, alnil, indigo
an oily, colorless poisonous liquid with a strong odor and burning taste, formerly extracted from the indigo plant and now made synthetically from nitrobenzene and used in the manufacture of aniline dyes. Industrial workers exposed to aniline are at risk of developing methemoglobinemia and bone marrow suppression. Also called amidobenzene, benzenamine.

an·i·line

(an'i-lin)
An oily, colorless or brownish liquid, of aromatic odor and acrid taste, which is the parent substance of many synthetic dyes. Aniline is highly toxic and may cause industrial poisoning.
[Ar. an-nil, indigo]
References in periodicals archive ?
The margins were six lengths and five, with Diatome third, while Free Ride passed Tom Rolfe and Anilin late to claim fourth place.
The most famous horse bred there is Anilin, foaled in 1961, by the Russian stallion Element out of Analogichnaya.
Also ran (in finishing order): Free Ride, Anilin, Tom Rolfe, Demi Deuil, Carvin, Meadow Court, Marco Visconti, Timmy Lad, Emerald, Ragazzo, Sigebert, Ardaban, Soderini,
Sponsorship for the race was organised by Mikhail Nasibov in honour of his father, Nikolai, who rode Anilin to three victories in the Preis von Europa in the 1960s.
In the 1960s, one of the flagbearers was Anilin, who completed a hat-trick in the Preis von Europa, ran second and third in the Washington International, and was fifth in Sea-Bird's Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe.
The four-year-old division comprised Free Ride (Prix Greffulhe, Ganay), Demi Deuil (Grosser Preis von Baden), Emerald (Prix Maurice de Nieuil), Ardaban (Prix Cappiello), Oncidium (Coronation Cup), Soderini (John Porter Stakes, Hardwicke Stakes), Sigebert (Prix d'Harcourt), Francilius (placed in the Grand Prix de Saint-Cloud), Timmy Lad (placed in the Grand Prix de Deauville) and Anilin (Russian Derby).