anhedonia

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anhedonia

 [an″he-do´ne-ah]
inability to enjoy what is usually pleasurable.

an·he·do·ni·a

(an'hē-dō'nē-ă),
Absence of pleasure from the performance of acts that would ordinarily be pleasurable.
[G. an- priv. + hedonē, pleasure]

anhedonia

/an·he·do·nia/ (an″he-do´ne-ah) inability to experience pleasure in normally pleasurable acts.

anhedonia

(ăn′hē-dō′nē-ə)
n.
The inability to experience pleasure, as seen in certain mood disorders.

an′he·don′ic (-dŏn′ĭk) adj.

anhedonia

[an′hēdō′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, a + hedone, not pleasure
the inability to feel pleasure or happiness in response to experiences that are ordinarily pleasurable. It is often a characteristic of major depression and schizophrenia. anhedonic, adj.

anhedonia

Psychiatry Absence of pleasure from activities that are normally or had previously been pleasurable. See Sexual anhedonia. Cf Hedonism.

an·he·do·nia

(an'hē-dō'nē-ă)
Absence of pleasure from the performance of acts that would ordinarily be pleasurable.
[G. an- priv. + hedonē, pleasure]
References in periodicals archive ?
Schzotypal, schizoid and paranoid characteristics in the biological parents of social anhedonics.
A few scenes further on, Shakespeare expands on the adumbrations in this passage when, with as much frankness as Elizabethan propriety permits, Kate, Hotspur's long-suffering wife, who is both forthright and womanly, reproves her anhedonic husband for treating her as "a banished woman from my Harry's bed" (2.
I 8), it was found that many gene sets associate with anhedonic depression.
It is our hypothesis that both hedonic and anhedonic behaviors are outcomes in-part of an individual's risk alleles for these behaviors and that treatment resides in appropriately targeting these identified polymorphisms.
Acetyl-L-carnitine for alcohol craving and relapse prevention in anhedonic alcoholics: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial.
McCreery and Claridge (1995, 1996) had previously reported that OBE experients scored higher than nonexperients on measures of positive schizotypy (Perceptual Aberration, Luanay-Slade Hallucination Scale, STA, Hypomania) and significantly lower on a measure of negative schizotypy (the Physical Anhedonia Scale), suggesting that, "far from being anhedonic, they were particularly enjoying life.
If poorer performance on the perspective-taking protocol is observed in the high social anhedonic group, and if a link emerges between the scores on the two tasks in the whole sample of participants, this would support the RFT interpretation of ToM.