angle of incidence

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an·gle of in·ci·dence

1. the angle that a ray entering a refracting medium makes with a line drawn perpendicular to the surface of this medium;
2. the angle that a ray striking a reflecting surface makes with a line perpendicular to this surface.
Synonym(s): incident angle

angle of incidence

the angle at which an ultrasound beam hits the interface between two different types of tissues, such as the facing surfaces of bone and muscle. The angle is also affected by the difference in acoustic impedance of the different tissues.

an·gle of in·ci·dence

(anggĕl insi-dĕns)
1. Angle that a ray entering a refracting medium makes with a line drawn perpendicular to the surface of this medium;
2. Angle that a ray striking a reflecting surface makes with a line perpendicular to this surface.
Synonym(s): incident angle.

angle of incidence

the angle at which a body, object or vector is moving relative to another (e.g. a stationary surface or environmental factor such as wind), often prior to a collision. Example: when playing a snooker ball at a cushion, the angle between the ball's direction of travel and the cushion.
References in periodicals archive ?
p] values calculated for a single internal reflection from both ZnSe and Ge internal reflection elements at two commonly used angles of incidence.
1949), Konig (1949a, 1949b), and Beyersdoffer (1949) in the late 1940s pieced together a very concrete theory of thin film morphology at both normal and oblique angles of incidence.
Measurements with a rotatable sample holder were particularly useful since they served the purpose of validating the measurements obtained with the IS and also gave some information on the transmittance at grazing angles of incidence.
However, for the common case of an organic film on a chromium surface in an organic medium, the sensitivity for both P end A has been calculated for various angles of incidence and film thicknesses up to 1000 A.
Canon's SWC helps minimize flare and ghosting caused by bright light from large angles of incidence.
The examination of the axles with a longitudinal hole is drilled from the inner bore surface in both axial directions of incidence of at least two different angles of incidence in both circumferential directions with a respective angle of incidence and in the vertical insonification.