angle of reflection


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an·gle of re·flec·tion

the angle that a ray reflected from a surface makes with a line drawn perpendicular to this surface; it is equal to the angle of incidence (2).

angle of reflection

after a collision, the angle at which one object is moving relative to another (usually a stationary surface or environmental factor such as wind). Example: after a snooker ball has hit a cushion, the angle between the ball's direction of travel and the cushion. It is not necessarily the same size as the angle of incidence. Also known as angle of rebound.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the angle of incidence is equal to the angle of reflection, they will discover that no matter how far back they stand, they will be unable to see their feet in a small mirror placed at eye level.
of Chicago, who found that the mean-free path of an electron through a pure sample of magnesium was something over one centimeter in the small angle of reflection direction.
Read the height and sound of impact as it contacts the front wall as well as the angle of incidence and subsequent angle of reflection in order to refine the pre-shoot position for your next shot.
Debbie Bathgate, lens product manager at Rodenstock, said: "Everyday glare can be annoying and uncomfortable on the eyes, but when the angle of reflection is such that it becomes blinding, serious accidents can occur.
Light that bounces off of a mirror is governed by the law of reflection, which states that the angle of incidence is equal (and opposite) to the angle of reflection.
For example, the reflection from the fuselage of an aircraft can be quire large, but this high reflectivity is not available to the radar unless the receiver is positioned at the angle of reflection which results from angle of incidence.