angiostrongyliasis


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angiostrongyliasis

 [an″je-o-stron″jĭ-li´ah-sis]
infection by nematodes of the genus Angiostrongylus.

angiostrongyliasis

/an·gio·stron·gy·li·a·sis/ (an″je-o-stron″jĭ-li´ah-sis) infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

angiostrongyliasis

[an′jē·ō·stron′ji·lī′ə·sis]
infection by a species of Angiostrongylus. Infection comes after eating contaminated raw or insufficiently cooked hosts such as snails, slugs, prawns, or crabs. Adult worms live in rat intestines, in which females lay eggs yielding first stage larvae. These larvae hatch and migrate to the rat's pharynx, where they are swallowed and shed in the feces and ingested by an intermediate host, such as snails or slugs. Most cases occur in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin. A. costaricensis causes abdominal or intestinal angiostrongyliasis. Abdominal cases have been reported in Costa Rica and occur most commonly in young children. A. cantonensis larvae migrate to the central nervous system and cause eosinophilic meningitis.

angiostrongyliasis

Infestation with the rat worm parasites Angiostrongylus cantonensis and A. costaricensis usually acquired by eating snails, shrimps or fish, the intermediate hosts. The former parasite can affect the brain causing eosinophilic MENINGITIS or the eyes causing visual loss. A. costaricensis causes eosinophilic GASTROENTERITIS.

angiostrongyliasis

infection by nematodes of the genus Angiostrongylus.
References in periodicals archive ?
One such threat includes an increasing prevalence of angiostrongyliasis, which should receive increased scrutiny in patients with eosinophilic meningitis from localities characterized by paratenic and intermediate hosts.
In addition to its agricultural importance, the giant African snail is a vector of the rat lung worm, the parasitic nematode, Angiostrongylus cantonensis Chen 1935 (Nematoda: Metastrongylidae), has been implicated in the spread of human cerebral angiostrongyliasis (or eosinophilic meningitis) throughout the Pacific Basin (Bisseru 1971; Chen 1974; Carney et al.
Human angiostrongyliasis is usually mild and self-limiting, and recovery takes place within a week, but paraesthesiae and muscular weakness may persist for years and represent chronic forms of the disease.
Michael Powell has written the book with Dr Oliver Fischer and can offer you anything from, say, angiostrongyliasis (you have to eat snails or let snails and slugs trail over your unwashed lettuce, so I should be OK) to Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (a rare condition with internal tumours).
Definitive diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis is established by the detection of A.
One notable omission is the absence of discussion of emerging helminthic diseases, such as angiostrongyliasis, cysticercosis, alveolar echinococcosis, and baylisascariasis.
This parasite has a complex life cycle (2) and causes cerebral angiostrongyliasis after ingestion of infective larvae found in freshwater and terrestrial snails and slugs, paratenic hosts (such as freshwater fish, shrimp, frogs, and crabs), and contaminated vegetables (3).
Because large numbers of persons from Europe travel to destinations where angiostrongyliasis is endemic, it is somewhat surprising that the infection has been rarely described in Europe.
With the increase of income and living standards, and the pursuit of exotic and delicate foods, populations around the world have seen angiostrongyliasis become an important foodborne parasitic zoonosis (1-9).
Our review of angiostrongyliasis in China found that the disease is emerging as a result of changes in food consumption habits and long-distance transportation of food.
angiostrongyliasis was epidemiologically unlikely), we collected only demographic data and discharge diagnoses.