angiodysplasia


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angiodysplasia

 [an″je-o-dis-pla´zhah]
small vascular abnormalities, such as of the intestinal tract.

an·gi·o·dys·pla·si·a

(an'jē-ō-dis-plā'zē-ă),
Degenerative or congenital structural abnormality of the normally distributed vasculature.

angiodysplasia

/an·gio·dys·pla·sia/ (-dis-pla´zhah) small vascular abnormalities, such as of the intestinal tract.

angiodysplasia

A degenerative lesion of previously healthy blood vessels, found most commonly in the caecum and proximal ascending colon and characterised by vascular ectasias usually affecting those above age 60. Angiodysplasia increases with age, accounts for 40% of the cases of recurrent or chronic lower GI bleeding in the elderly, and is associated with diverticula and aortic stenosis

angiodysplasia

Colonic angiodysplasia Gastroenterology An abnormal aggregate of blood vessels–vascular ectasias usually in the right colon in persons > age 60; angiodysplasia accounts for 40% of the cases of recurrent or chronic lower GI bleeding in the elderly

an·gi·o·dys·pla·sia

(an'jē-ō-dis-plā'zē-ă)
Degenerative or congenital structural abnormality of the normally distributed vasculature.

angiodysplasia

Abnormal blood vessel formation. Angiodysplasia of the intestinal lining is one of the causes of bleeding into the bowel.

angiodysplasia

small vascular abnormalities, especially of the intestinal tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ISSVA classification is useful for identifying clinical landmarks, because some of the entities are associated with skin lesions, as is the case for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome, Parkes-Weber syndrome, while other entities do not include lesions of the skin, for example angiodysplasia and arteriovenous malformations (Lowe et al 2012).
Other vascular lesions, such as angiodysplasia, can be distinguished from angiolipoma because the former do not contain appreciable adipose tissue and do exhibit a proliferation of small, dilated, and distorted thin-walled blood vessels with focal mucosal extension.
Hemangioma, telangiectasia, angiodysplasia, and phlebectasia are typical forms of small bowel vascular lesions.
Differential diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (2) Colonic Anorectal Ileojejunal Diverticular disease Hemorrhoids NSAID ulceration Angiodysplasia Anal fissure Merkel's diverticulum Colitis (ulcerative, Solitary rectal ulcer Angiodysplasia Crohn, ischemic, pseudomembraneous) Colorectal carcinoma Radiation proctitis Arteriovenous malformation
Successful treatment of thalidomide for recurrent bleeding due to gastric angiodysplasia in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.
The pathogenesis of angiosarcoma remains elusive; however, chronic lymphedema, familial angiodysplasia, prior anabolic steroid therapy, and exposure to vinyl chloride, thorotrast or arsenic have been identified as predisposing factors.
Vascular malformation such as hemangiomas and angiodysplasia in children are rare causes of painless LGIB.
Also, Heyde syndrome is characterized by calcific aortic stenosis, acquired von Willebrand disease, and angiodysplasia in colon and caecum causing gastrointestinal haemorrhage.
Bleeding from the small intestine can be result from vascular malformation, angiodysplasia, ulcera, tumors (malignant or benign) and Meckel's diverticulum.
The most frequent causes of occult GI blood loss are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colonic cancer/polyp, gastric cancer, angiodysplasia, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis [7].
Acute massive LGI hemorrhage is commonly found in ICU patients, and the disease is a common clinical problem with multiple causes, including rectal ulcer, hemorrhoids, angiodysplasia, diverticulosis, and ischemic colitis.