angiitis


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Related to angiitis: Hypersensitivity angiitis

an·gi·i·tis

, angitis (an'jē-ī'tis, an-jī'tis),
Inflammation of a blood vessel (arteritis, phlebitis) or lymphatic vessel (lymphangitis).
Synonym(s): vasculitis
[angio- + G. -itis, inflammation]

angiitis

/an·gi·i·tis/ (-i´tis) pl. angii´tides   vasculitis.
allergic granulomatous angiitis  Churg-Strauss syndrome.

angiitis

[anjē·ī′tis]
Etymology: Gk, angeion, vessel, itis
an inflammation of a vessel, chiefly a blood or lymph vessel. See also vasculitis.

angiitis

Vasculitis, see there. See Cerebral granulomatous angiitis, Cutaneous leukocytoclasticangiitis.

an·gi·i·tis

, angitis (an'jē-ī'tis, an-jī'tis)
Inflammation of a blood vessel (arteritis, phlebitis) or lymphatic vessel (lymphangitis).
Synonym(s): vasculitis.
[angio- + G. -itis, inflammation]

angiitis

Inflammation of a blood vessel.

angiitis

; vasculitis inflammation of a vessel, e.g. arteritis, phlebitis, lymphangitis

an·gi·i·tis

, angitis (an'jē-ī'tis, an-jī'tis)
Inflammation of a blood vessel (arteritis, phlebitis) or lymphatic vessel (lymphangitis).
[angio- + G. -itis, inflammation]

angiitis

inflammation of the coats of a vessel, chiefly blood or lymph vessels. Called also vasculitis. Local or generalized, the latter e.g. in hypersensitivity states.
References in periodicals archive ?
Allergic granulomatosis, allergic angiitis, and periarteritis nodosa.
Primary (granulomatous) angiitis of the central nervous system: a clinicopathologic analysis of 15 new cases and a review of the literature.
Brain biopsy in primary angiitis of the central nervous system.
Arterioles and venules were thick and showed prominent sclerosis and eosinophilic angiitis (Figure, D).
Because of the clinical presentation of asthma and allergic sinusitis, and the histologic findings of angiitis and extravascular necrotizing and nonnecrotizing granulomas with eosinophilic infiltrate in our patient, we believe the lymphadenopathy to be a manifestation of CSS.
Recognition of the ability of VZV to directly infect blood vessel walls has been slow to occur[4-6,50-54] despite a seminal report by Linnemann and Alvira[54] in 1980 demonstrating the virus in the outer layers of vessel walls in a patient with Hodgkin disease and granulomatous angiitis after ophthalmic zoster.
Granulomatous angiitis of the nervous system in cases of herpes zoster and lymphosarcoma.