aneroid


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an·er·oid

(an'er-oyd),
Without fluid; denoting a form of barometer without mercury, in which the varying air pressure is indicated by a pointer governed by the movement of the elastic wall of an evacuated chamber. Also used to denote a mercury-free pressure gauge used with some sphygmomanometers.
[G. a- priv. + nēros, wet, + eidos, form]

aneroid

[an′əroid]
not containing a liquid. The term is used especially to describe a device that does not contain liquid, but that performs the same function as a similar device containing liquid. An example is aneroid barometer.

aneroid

adjective Without liquid; fluidless.

an·er·oid

(an'ĕr-oyd)
Not containing liquid (e.g., a sphygmomanometer that does not contain a column of liquid mercury).
[G. a- priv. + nēros, wet, + eidos, form]

an·er·oid

(an'ĕr-oyd)
Without fluid.
[G. a- priv. + nēros, wet, + eidos, form]
References in periodicals archive ?
An aneroid manometer (American Diagnostic Corporation [R] E-Sphyg2 [TM], Hauppauge, NY) was used as the control modality for this study.
In order to minimize measurement error, the equipment to be used, whether aneroid, electronic, or mercury, should be regularly inspected and calibrated.
E Coleman reached Athabasca Pass in 1893, the elevations of Athabasca Pass and Mount Brown were measured using an aneroid barometer and boiling point thermometer.
Aneroid monitors resemble the blood pressure monitor your doctor probably uses, with a cuff that's inflated by squeezing a rubber bulb.
From here, Aneroid Mountain looms from a wall of stripey red-brown cliffs on the horizon.
The Palm Aneroid Sphygmomanometer by Labtron is a convenient, compact and hand-held device.
OLP was assessed by closing the expiratory valve of the circle system at a fixed gas flow rate of 3 l/min with ventilation stopped and noting the airway pressure at which the dial on a calibrated aneroid manometer (accuracy [+ or -] 2 cm[H.
Together with the gravity measurements were also measured additional quantities (Trakal and Lederer, 2003) (air pressure by the aneroid Paulin, air temperature by the sling thermometer and heights of the top of the gravimeters above the top of the station stabilization) at the stations.
Nearly two centuries later, scientists discovered a way of measuring pressure without the use of mercury and the Aneroid barometer came into being.
Aneroid sphygmomanometers are the substitution but studies are inconsistent about their accuracy (Canzanello, Jensen, & Schwartz, 2001; Jones, Frohlich, Grim, Grim, & Taubert, 2001; Tholl et al.
Their website boasts of "an incredible variety of weather predictors, from conventional mercury and aneroid barometers.