androgen ablation

androgen ablation

The therapeutic reduction of circulating androgens (testosterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone) by either orchiectomy or by an luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist. Androgen ablation is commonly used in metastatic prostate cancer and results in disease attenuation (12–18 months) in up to 80% of patients. Androgen ablation can be augmented by flutamide, an androgen receptor antagonist that blocks the effect of androgens produced by the adrenal gland.
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Quality of life (QOL) analysis from CHAARTED: Chemohormonal androgen ablation randomized trial in prostate cancer (E3805).
Androgen ablation therapy are generally known as the first line of treatment and thus expected to hold maximum revenue share in overall hormone sensitive prostate cancer treatment market.
The localized disease often responds to conventional therapies like androgen ablation via castration and/or administration of chemical inhibitors but advanced disease resistant to any curative therapies is still challenge for investigators.
6) Androgen ablation therapy is frequently used in prostate cancer management because it has been shown that a significant reduction in serum testosterone levels results in regression of advanced prostate cancer.
Additional drugs can be used to achieve complete androgen ablation by blocking androgen production.
For more advanced cancers that have either recurred or metastasized, the gold standard treatment is androgen ablation therapy (2).
We (5) have recently reported a direct analysis of the expression of the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene in surgical samples from a total of 84 patients, 24 of whom had received presurgery androgen ablation therapy.
However, in 2007, the mainstay of treatment for advanced PCA remains androgen ablation therapy as originally introduced in the early 1940s.
For decades, androgen ablation has remained the frontline treatment for CaP that is no longer organ-confined and thus deemed surgically inoperable.
Testicular tissue was obtained from prostate cancer patients (n= 10, between 60 to 65 years old), under procedures of uni or bilateral testicular surgery (orchiectomy) corresponding to an androgen ablation therapy.
Adjuvant radiotherapy also increased biochemical control, avoided the need for androgen ablation, decreased detectable local failures, and decreased metastatic disease.
Early-stage prostate cancer typically requires androgen for growth and thus responds to androgen ablation (Feldman and Feldman 2001).