anatomy

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anatomy

 [ah-nat´o-me]
the science dealing with the form and structure of living organisms.
Examples of specialty areas of anatomy and physiology. From Applegate, 2000.
clinical anatomy anatomy as applied to clinical practice.
comparative anatomy description and comparison of the form and structure of different animals.
developmental anatomy the field of embryology concerned with the changes that cells, tissues, organs, and the body as a whole undergo from a germ cell of each parent to the resulting offspring; it includes both prenatal and postnatal development.
gross anatomy (macroscopic anatomy) that dealing with structures visible with the unaided eye.
microscopic anatomy histology.
morbid anatomy (pathologic anatomy) anatomy of diseased tissues.
radiologic anatomy x-ray anatomy.
special anatomy anatomy devoted to study of particular organs or parts.
topographic anatomy that devoted to determination of relative positions of various body parts.
x-ray anatomy study of organs and tissues based on their visualization by x-rays in both living and dead bodies.

a·nat·o·my

(ă-nat'ŏ-mē), [TA]
1. The morphologic structure of an organism.
2. The science of the morphology or structure of organisms.
3. Synonym(s): dissection
4. A work describing the form and structure of an organism and its various parts.
[G. anatomē, dissection, from ana, apart, + tomē, a cutting]

anatomy

/anat·o·my/ (ah-nat´ah-me) the science of the structure of living organisms.
applied anatomy  anatomy as applied to diagnosis and treatment.
clinical anatomy  anatomy as applied to clinical practice.
comparative anatomy  comparison of the structure of different animals and plants, one with another.
developmental anatomy  the field of study concerned with the changes that cells, tissues, organs, and the body as a whole undergo from fertilization of a secondary oocyte to the resulting offspring; it includes both prenatal and postnatal development.
gross anatomy  that dealing with structures visible with the unaided eye.
histologic anatomy  histology.
homologic anatomy  the study of the related parts of the body in different animals.
macroscopic anatomy  gross a.
microscopic anatomy  histology.
morbid anatomy , pathological anatomy anatomic pathology.
physiological anatomy  the study of the organs with respect to their normal functions.
radiological anatomy  the study of the anatomy of tissues based on their visualization on x-ray films.
special anatomy  the study of particular organs or parts.
topographic anatomy  the study of parts in their relation to surrounding parts.
x-ray anatomy  radiological a.

anatomy

(ə-năt′ə-mē)
n. pl. anato·mies
1. The bodily structure of a plant or an animal or of any of its parts.
2. The science of the shape and structure of organisms and their parts.
3. A treatise on anatomic science.
4. Dissection of a plant or animal to study the structure, position, and interrelation of its various parts.
5. A skeleton.
6. The human body.

anatomy

[ənat′əmē]
Etymology: Gk, ana + temnein, to cut
1 the study, classification, and description of structures and organs of the body.
2 the structure of an organism. See also applied anatomy, comparative anatomy, gross anatomy, microscopic anatomy, surface anatomy. Compare physiology. anatomical, adj.

anatomy

The study of bodily structures and their relationships with each other.

a·nat·o·my

(ă-nat'ŏ-mē) [TA]
1. The morphologic structure of an organism.
2. The science of the morphology or structure of organisms.
3. Synonym(s): dissection.
4. A work describing the form and structure of an organism and its various parts.
[G. anatomē, dissection, from ana, apart, + tomē, a cutting]

anatomy

1. The structure of the body, or the study of the structure.
2. A textbook or treatise on anatomical science.

anatomy

the science of the structure of living organisms.

Anatomy

The science of the body structure of an organism and its parts.

anatomy,

n 1. the study of the structure and parts of the body.
2. in chiropractic, a component of the vertebral subluxation complex that refers to the specific structural implications present when subluxation has occurred.

a·nat·o·my

(ă-nat'ŏ-mē) [TA]
Morphologic structure of an organism.
[G. anatomē, dissection, from ana, apart, + tomē, a cutting]

anatomy (ənat´ōmē),

n the science of the form, structure, and parts of animal organisms.
anatomy, dental,
n the science of the structure of the teeth and the relationship of their parts. The study involves macroscopic and microscopic components.
anatomy, radiographic,
n the images on a radiographic film of the combined anatomic structures through which the roentgen rays (radiographs) have passed.

anatomy

the science dealing with the form and structure of living organisms.

comparative anatomy
description and comparison of the form and structure of different animals.
developmental anatomy
the changes in form from fertilization to adulthood, including embryology, fetology and postnatal development.
gross anatomy
that dealing with structures visible with the unaided eye. Called also macroscopic anatomy.
macroscopic anatomy
see gross anatomy (above).
microscopic anatomy
anatomy revealed by microscopy; includes histology and cytology.
morbid anatomy
anatomy of diseased tissues. Called also pathological anatomy.
pathological anatomy
see morbid anatomy (above).
radiological anatomy
anatomy revealed by the techniques of radiography and fluoroscopy.
special anatomy
anatomy devoted to study of particular organs or parts.
topographic anatomy
that devoted to determination of relative positions of various body parts; regional anatomy.
x-ray anatomy
see radiological anatomy (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides, there are times in American Anatomies where Wiegman's insistence on the primacy of "visual economies" is well taken, as when she argues, apropos those integrationist buddy films, that "in the frantic move toward representational integration, in both popular culture and the literary canon, the question of political power has been routinely displaced as a vapid fetishization of the visible has emerged to take its place.
It is too simple to argue, as Heckscher does, that public anatomies directly inspired artists to produce work of this sort.
His discussion will highlight data from 378 patients treated over seven years with the Powerlink that demonstrates the long-term efficacy of an implant strategy of anatomical fixation to place the Powerlink stent graft on the aortic bifurcation, which allows for treating anatomies previously unsuitable for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR).