anaplasia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to anaplasia: metaplasia

anaplasia

 [an″ah-pla´zhah]
loss of differentiation of cells and their orientation to each other, a characteristic of tumor cells; called also dedifferentiation and undifferentiation.

an·a·pla·si·a

(an'ă-plā'zē-ă),
Loss of structural differentiation, especially as seen in most, but not all, malignant neoplasms.
Synonym(s): dedifferentiation (2)
[G. ana, again, + plasis, a molding]

anaplasia

/ana·pla·sia/ (-pla´zhah) dedifferentiation; loss of differentiation of cells and of their orientation to one another and to their axial framework and blood vessels, a characteristic of tumor tissue.anaplas´tic

anaplasia

(ăn′ə-plā′zhə)
n.
Reversion of cells to an immature or a less differentiated form, as occurs in most malignant tumors.

anaplasia

[an′əplā′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, ana + plassein, to shape
a change in the structure and orientation of cells, characterized by a loss of differentiation and reversion to a more primitive form. Anaplasia is characteristic of malignancy. Compare aplasia. anaplastic, adj.

anaplasia

A state in which a malignant cell or tissue has undergone structural or functional dedifferentiation to the point where its lineage and/or tissue of origin cannot be determined with complete certainty. Anaplastic tumours usually have high mitotic activity and bizarre cellular morphology.

an·a·pla·si·a

(an'ă-plā'zē-ă)
Loss of structural differentiation, especially as seen in most, but not all, malignant neoplasms.
Synonym(s): dedifferentiation (2) .
[G. ana, again, + plasis, a molding]

anaplasia

Loss of the cellular microscopic features which distinguish one type from another. Anaplastic cells become smaller and simpler in structure and no longer combine to form recognizable tissues. Anaplasia is a common feature of cancer and, in general, the greater the anaplasia the more malignant and dangerous the tumour.

anaplasia

the reversion of cells to a more undifferentiated form.

an·a·pla·si·a

(an'ă-plā'zē-ă)
Loss of structural differentiation, especially as seen in most, but not all, malignant neoplasms.
Synonym(s): dedifferentiation (2) .
[G. ana, again, + plasis, a molding]

anaplasia (an´əplā´zhə),

n a regressive change in cells toward a more primitive or embryonic cell type. It is a prominent characteristic of malignancy in tumors.

anaplasia

loss of differentiation of cells, an irreversible alteration in adult cells toward more primitive (embryonic) cell types; a characteristic of tumor cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
The data also support the routine use of BAF47 immunoreactivity in analyzing small cell embryonal tumors, the use of OTX2 to characterize anaplasia in MBs, the identification of moderate to severe anaplasia in MBs, and the recognition of nodularity in MBs, all of which proved significant in characterizing prognosis in embryonal tumors of the pediatric CNS.
27) Cellular anaplasia, loss of polarity, discohesion, nuclear enlargement, hyperchromasia, pleomorphism and atypical mitoses are the histopathological hallmarks of CIS.
WHO/ISUP (1998)--WHO (2004) Consensus Classification for Urothelial (Transitional Cell) Lesions Normal Normal Hyperplasia Flat hyperplasia Flat lesions with atypia Reactive (inflammatory) atypia Atypia of unknown significance Dysplasia (low-grade intraurothelial neoplasia) Carcinoma in situ (high-grade intraurothelial neoplasia) Papillary neoplasms Papilloma Inverted papilloma Papillary neoplasm of low malignant potential Papillary carcinoma, low grade Papillary carcinoma, high grade* Invasive neoplasms # Option exists to add comment as to the presence of marked anaplasia.
A highgrade tumor is characterized by a smaller amount of intracystic component, a higher mitotic count, and the presence of neural invasion, necrosis, and anaplasia.
Establishing histopathologic criteria of malignancy for these tumors can be difficult because nuclear anaplasia may be absent, slight, or moderate.
The grading of bone tumors is largely driven by the histologic diagnosis, and traditionally grading has been based on the Broders system, which assesses cellularity and nuclear features and degree of anaplasia.
Microscopically; mucosa revealed diffuse urothelial dysplasia with loss of polarity, nuclear atypia; and carcinoma in situ with irregular nuclear crowding, nuclear anaplasia and mitosis, involving entire thickness of the epithelial layer.
He describes how gene mutations are not powerful enough to cause cancer; how cancer is initiated and why progression takes years or decades; and the global or macroscopic characteristics that identify cancer: anaplasia, autonomous growth, metastasis, abnormal cell morphology, DNA indices from 0.
Prognostic histology may be divided into favourable histology (triphasic Wilms' tumour and cystic, partially differentiated nephroblastoma) and unfavourable histology (focal or diffuse anaplasia, and cells that are more abnormal and appear bizarre with large and distorted nuclei).
Histologically, these tumors usually demonstrate definitive anaplasia, although sometimes the distinction between a periosteal chondroma and low-grade chondrosarcoma is difficult or indeterminate.
Microscopic analysis revealed that the tumour was a nephroblastoma without anaplasia (Fig.
Anisocytosis and anisokaryosis were moderate, while pleomorphism and anaplasia were low-grade.