analgesic ladder

A venerated approach to managing a range of pain severity, formulated by the WHO for cancer; the ladder divides pain into
(1) mild—requiring NSAIDs and, if the pain is post-operative in nature, infiltration with local anaesthetics
(2) moderate—Step 1 plus opioid analgesics PRN
(3) severe—Step 1 and Step 2 plus local anesthetic neural blockade ±catheter plus sustained-release opioid analgesics
The stepwise approach to pain is valid for other types of pain—e.g., postoperative pain, sickle crisis pain, pelvic inflammatory disease

analgesic ladder

, World Health Organization analgesic ladder
A framework for the treatment of pain in patients with cancer and other disorders, in which the patient is treated first with anti-inflammatory analgesics such as ibuprofen or mild, non-narcotic pain relievers such as acetaminophen but subsequently may be treated with narcotic analgesics of increasing strengths if anti-inflammatory drugs or adjunctive therapies do not alleviate pain.
References in periodicals archive ?
The protocol was based on the World Health Organization analgesic ladder and the Beating osteoARThritis strategy for stepped care in hip and knee OA (Arthritis Care Res.
The World Health Organisation's analgesic ladder, although developed for managing cancer pain, is used as a guide for managing acute and chronic pain worldwide.
Compare and contrast the strengths and limitations of the renal adaptation of the World Health Organization (WHO) analgesic ladder
10) This analgesic ladder approach is not an evidence-based guideline, but provides a systemic approach to the management of cancer pain, (11) especially in resource-limited areas.
According to the analgesic ladder (Figure 1) paracetamol should first be tried: if ineffective, when taken as recommended, codeine should be added, and only after that (step 2) should NSAIDs be considered.
For other patients, their pain defies understanding and does not respond to the standard analgesic ladder of NSAID-adjuvant-opioid.
Step 1 of the WHO analgesic ladder recommends acetaminophen, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or adjuvants as first-line therapy for mild pain.
The WHO method consists of a three-step analgesic ladder in which more aggressive therapy can be added as the resident experiences increasing pain, (with [+ or -] meaning "with or without"):
In 1990, the World Health Organization proposed an analgesic ladder for the treatment of cancer pain.
Pain Pathways Types of Pain Measurement of Pain Treatment Modalities-Pharmacologic Management Analgesic Ladder Step I Drugs Step II Drugs Step III Drugs
Which of the following statements regarding the renal WHO analgesic ladder in hemodialysis patients is false: