anaesthetic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to anaesthetic: topical anaesthetic

anaesthetic

(ăn′ĭs-thĕt′ĭk)
adv. & n.
Variant of anesthetic.

anaesthetic

See anesthetic.

anaesthetic

adjective
(1) Inducing, referring to, or characterised by anaesthesia.
(2) Characterised by a loss of sensation or awareness; numbness.
 
noun An agent or drug that limits or eliminates sensation of pain or awareness of surroundings.

an·es·thet·ic

(an'es-thet'ik)
1. A compound that depresses neuronal function, producing loss of ability to perceive pain and/or other sensations.
2. Collective designation for anesthetizing agents administered to a person at a particular time.
3. Characterized by loss of sensation or capable of producing loss of sensation.
4. Associated with or due to the state of anesthesia.
Synonym(s): anaesthetic.

anaesthetic

1. Insensitive.
2. Relating to anaesthesia.
3. Causing anaesthesia.
4. A drug used to cause unconsciousness or insensitivity to pain.

anaesthetic

literally, without sensation. A substance administered in order to allow surgical procedures that would normally cause pain. A general anaesthetic, given by inhalation or injection, acts in the brain and causes loss of consciousness; a local anaesthetic, injected into the relevant tissue, prevents transmission along sensory nerves. vb anaesthetize to administer an anaesthetic; anaesthetized or under anaesthesia the state of the patient so treated.

anaesthetic

an agent causing reversible suppression of nerve function, to reduce awareness of pain or sensation

anaesthetic 

Any substance used to produce a loss of pain sensation either in the whole of the body when unconscious (general anaesthetic) or to some part of the body when awake (local anaesthetic). Note: also spelt anesthetic.
local anaesthetic's Chemical agents that prevent the transmission of nerve impulses by binding to the sodium channel and thus blocking the transient rush of sodium ions through the cell membrane. They act locally and without loss of consciousness. They can be either ester-linked (e.g. benoxinate, cocaine, oxybuprocaine hydrochloride (benoxinate), proxymetacaine hydrochloride, and tetracaine hydrochloride) or amide-linked (e.g. bupivacaine, lidocaine hydrochloride and procaine). Ester types are applied mainly topically whereas amide types are usually administered by injection. See peribulbar injection; receptor potential.

an·es·thet·ic

(an'es-thet'ik)
1. Agent or compound that reversibly depresses neuronal function, which produces loss of ability to perceive pain and/or other sensations.
2. Characterized by loss of sensation or capable of producing loss of sensation.
Synonym(s): anaesthetic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Having a slight heart problem and beingafewstonesoverweightputhim at added risk of complications from general anaesthetic.
Brian West, who owns a shop in Stirchley, Birmingham, said his wife had undergone general anaesthetics before with no adverse reaction and did not suffer from any allergies.
The Anaesthetic Mortality Committee of Western Australia has received reports of deaths of patients occurring within 48 hours of receiving an anaesthetic (or when anaesthesia was implicated in the death irrespective of the time frame) as a legal requirement since 1980(9) and has accumulated a substantial database.
Nurses applying to become anaesthetic technicians may be required to undertake a competence assessment before registration.
Judge John Milford, introducing the case to jurors at Newcastle Crown Court, told them: "The allegations are the defendant indecently touched a number of female patients who were recovering from general anaesthetics and were under his care.
Regional anaesthesia is different to a local anaesthetic as it works on the nerves affecting the whole arm, rather than a part of it.
He spoke after a report by the Royal College of Anaesthetists which said that if there was the possibility that donors could feel pain, they should be given an anaesthetic.
Mrs Campbell said she told dentist Mr Pederson that Darren had an anaesthetic the previous year and "had taken a little while to come out of it".
Prof Donaldson said: 'We are bringing to an end general anaesthetics in the dentist's chair which have been responsible for a small number of tragic deaths, many involving children.
The clinic fully reviews procedures for patients under general anaesthetic.
At the time of our experiments, sevoflurane washout times had not been determined for the Datex-Ohmeda Aisys[R] (GE Healthcare, Chalfont St Giles, Buckinghamshire, UK) anaesthetic machine, and desflurane washout times had not been determined for either the Datex-Ohmeda Aestiva[R] (GE Healthcare, Chalfont St Giles, Buckinghamshire, UK) or the Aisys anaesthetic machines.