anaerobe

(redirected from anaerobically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to anaerobically: Anaerobically digested

anaerobe

 [an´er-ōb]
an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.(See accompanying table.) adj., adj anaero´bic.
facultative anaerobe a microorganism that can live and grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobe an organism that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen.

an·aer·obe

(an'ār-ōb, an-ār'ōb),
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of dioxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe

/an·aer·obe/ (an´ah-rōb) an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.
facultative anaerobes  microorganisms that can live and grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobes  microorganisms that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen; some are killed by oxygen.

anaerobe

(ăn′ə-rōb′, ăn-âr′ōb′)
n.
An organism, such as a bacterium, that can live in the absence of free oxygen.

anaerobe

[aner′ōb]
Etymology: Gk, a + aer, not air, bios, life
a microorganism that grows and lives in the complete or almost complete absence of oxygen. An example is Clostridium botulinum. Anaerobes are widely distributed in nature and in the body. Types include the facultative anaerobe and the obligate anaerobe. Compare aerobe, microaerophile. See also anaerobic infection. anaerobic, adj.

anaerobe

Any organism, usually a bacterium, capable of living without air. Anaerobic pathogens obtain their energy from fermentation; nonpathogenic anaerobes in nature obtain their energy from anaerobic respiration, in which nitrate or sulphate serve as electron acceptors.

The ropharynx, skin, colon and vagina harbor up to 1011 anaerobes/cm3; they are common causes of infection, and may be associated with aerobic flora in infections and abscesses of the oral cavity, upper respiratory tract, colon, genital tract, skin and brain; factors controlling anaerobes’ virulence are uncertain.
 
Management
Penicillin for supradiaphragmatic anaerobic infections; clindamycin, metronidazole, chloramphenicol or cephoxatin if the infection is below the diaphragm.

an·aer·obe

(an'ār-ōb)
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of oxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe

an organism able to metabolize in the absence of free oxygen, obtaining energy from the breakdown of glucose in ANAEROBIC RESPIRATION. Some anaerobes are obligate, i.e. they can only survive in the absence of oxygen; examples are bacteria that cause food poisoning (see BOTULISM). Others (the majority) can live in either the presence or the absence of oxygen and are called facultative. When oxygen is present, respiration in these types is of the aerobic type involving the KREBS CYCLE to release maximum energy; when oxygen is absent they rely solely on energy released in anaerobic respiration.

Anaerobe

A type of bacterium that does not require air or oxygen to live. Anaerobic bacteria are frequent causes of lung abscess.

anaerobe

microorganism that survives in the absence of free oxygen
  • facultative anaerobe microorganism that lives with or without free oxygen

  • obligate anaerobe microorganism that cannot survive in the presence of free oxygen

an·aer·obe

(an-ār'ōb)
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of oxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe (an´ərōb),

n a microorganism that can exist and grow only in the partial or complete absence of molecular oxygen.
anaerobe, facultative
n an organism that can grow in the absence or presence of oxygen.

anaerobe

an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.

facultative anaerobe
a microorganism that can grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobe
an organism that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barlaz persuasively and credibly testified that competent and reliable scientific evidence shows that plastics manufactured with the ECM Additive are anaerobically biodegradable.
Colour removal of anaerobically treated pulp and paper mill effluent by microorganisms in two steps bioreactor, Bioresource.
Biosolids and urea application rates ANDB, Anaerobically digested biosolids; ADB, aerobically digested biosolids; ds, dry solids Rates Urea ANDB (460kg N [t.
Plates were incubated anaerobically at 36[degrees]C ([+ or -] 1[degrees]C) for 48 hours ([+ or -] 4 hours).
For example, there are bacteria that oxidize methane aerobically and others that do it anaerobically.
Removal of heavy metals from anaerobically digested sewage sludge by indigenous iron-oxidizing bacteria.
The facility would act as a giant 24-hour-a-day working composter and anaerobically break down organic wastes such as grass clippings, manure and organic garbage into methane which would fuel a generator and produce electricity.
polymorphum culture (taken from the inflamed gingiva of an adult male, ATCC# 10953) was grown anaerobically using BBL Schaedler Broth with vitamin K1.
The testing plates were incubated at 37[degrees]C anaerobically with 80% N2, 10% CO2 and 10% H2 and after 5 days the diameters of inhibition zones formed around the specimens were measured using a caliper at three different points.
2] is not available allowing the organism to grow anaerobically.
Type II or fast twitch fibres predominantly generate energy anaerobically for a quick and powerful contraction, and exert 20% more force than slow-fibres.
Discolourisation of an anaerobically treated distillery effluent by activated charcoal adsorption method.