anaerobe


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Related to anaerobe: facultative anaerobe, Aerotolerant Anaerobe, exposure incident

anaerobe

 [an´er-ōb]
an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.(See accompanying table.) adj., adj anaero´bic.
facultative anaerobe a microorganism that can live and grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobe an organism that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen.

an·aer·obe

(an'ār-ōb, an-ār'ōb),
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of dioxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe

/an·aer·obe/ (an´ah-rōb) an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.
facultative anaerobes  microorganisms that can live and grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobes  microorganisms that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen; some are killed by oxygen.

anaerobe

(ăn′ə-rōb′, ăn-âr′ōb′)
n.
An organism, such as a bacterium, that can live in the absence of free oxygen.

anaerobe

[aner′ōb]
Etymology: Gk, a + aer, not air, bios, life
a microorganism that grows and lives in the complete or almost complete absence of oxygen. An example is Clostridium botulinum. Anaerobes are widely distributed in nature and in the body. Types include the facultative anaerobe and the obligate anaerobe. Compare aerobe, microaerophile. See also anaerobic infection. anaerobic, adj.

anaerobe

Any organism, usually a bacterium, capable of living without air. Anaerobic pathogens obtain their energy from fermentation; nonpathogenic anaerobes in nature obtain their energy from anaerobic respiration, in which nitrate or sulphate serve as electron acceptors.

The ropharynx, skin, colon and vagina harbor up to 1011 anaerobes/cm3; they are common causes of infection, and may be associated with aerobic flora in infections and abscesses of the oral cavity, upper respiratory tract, colon, genital tract, skin and brain; factors controlling anaerobes’ virulence are uncertain.
 
Management
Penicillin for supradiaphragmatic anaerobic infections; clindamycin, metronidazole, chloramphenicol or cephoxatin if the infection is below the diaphragm.

an·aer·obe

(an'ār-ōb)
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of oxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe

an organism able to metabolize in the absence of free oxygen, obtaining energy from the breakdown of glucose in ANAEROBIC RESPIRATION. Some anaerobes are obligate, i.e. they can only survive in the absence of oxygen; examples are bacteria that cause food poisoning (see BOTULISM). Others (the majority) can live in either the presence or the absence of oxygen and are called facultative. When oxygen is present, respiration in these types is of the aerobic type involving the KREBS CYCLE to release maximum energy; when oxygen is absent they rely solely on energy released in anaerobic respiration.

Anaerobe

A type of bacterium that does not require air or oxygen to live. Anaerobic bacteria are frequent causes of lung abscess.

anaerobe

microorganism that survives in the absence of free oxygen
  • facultative anaerobe microorganism that lives with or without free oxygen

  • obligate anaerobe microorganism that cannot survive in the presence of free oxygen

an·aer·obe

(an-ār'ōb)
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of oxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe (an´ərōb),

n a microorganism that can exist and grow only in the partial or complete absence of molecular oxygen.
anaerobe, facultative
n an organism that can grow in the absence or presence of oxygen.

anaerobe

an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.

facultative anaerobe
a microorganism that can grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobe
an organism that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although this organism is an anaerobe, it can tolerate oxygen and even grow in the presence of nanomolar concentrations of oxygen.
There is also a category for tests in the following categories: biochemical and other tests, aerobes, anaerobes, mycobacteria, and susceptibilities.
1), Bacteroides sp (1), unspecified anaerobe (3) Sapico and Montgomeric Lumbar Bacteroides fragilis, (1979) [1] Peptostreptococcus magnus, Proprionibacterium sp.
The data presented at Anaerobe today provides positive additional information for OPT-80, suggesting a trend toward clinical cure of the epidemic strain with our lead compound.
NASDAQ: OPTR) today announced further data from its Phase 2A clinical study of OPT-80, a potential treatment for Clostridium difficile infection, or CDI, have been accepted for presentation at the 9th Biennial Congress of the Anaerobe Society of the Americas, to be held in Long Beach, CA, June 25-27, 2008.
Some anaerobes, especially the gram-negative rods, can produce a variety of tissue-destroying enzymes, such as hyaluronidase, collagenase, or hemolysins.
The "angina" in this syndrome refers to an acute pharyngeal infection with the anaerobe Fusobacterium necrophorum.
Anaerobe Systems manufactures biopharmaceutical products for distribution to research laboratories, hospitals, clinics and other medical facilities.
June 24-27, 2008 ANAEROBE 2008 The 9th Biennial Congress of the Anaerobe Society of the Americas Marriott Hotel Long Beach, CA, USA http://www.
It may be better for some labs to use commercial anaerobe identification systems, but most products have unacceptably low accuracy rates.
The list even touches on troubleshooting skills that may be needed in an emergency, such as repairing a tear in the glove of the anaerobe chamber.
novyi in IDUs (7) and a botulism outbreak in IDUs in California (6), and is consistent with the obligate anaerobe characteristic of Clostridium spp.