anaemia


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anaemia

(ə-nē′mē-ə)
n.
Variant of anemia.

anaemia

See anemia.

anaemia

A condition characterised by decreased red cells or haemoglobin in the blood, resulting in decreased O2 in peripheral tissues. Anaemias are divided into various groups based on cause—e.g., iron deficiency anaemia, megaloblastic anaemia (due to decreased vitamin B12 or folic acid) or aplastic anaemia (where RBC precursors in the bone marrow are depleted).

Clinical findings
Fatigability, pallor, palpitations, shortness of breath.

Anaemia classifications
Morphology
Macrocytic   
• Megaloblastic anaemia:
       – Vitamin B12 deficiency;
       – Folic acid deficiency. 
Microcytic hypochromic 
• Iron-deficiency anaemia;
• Hereditary defects;
• Sickle cell anaemia; 
• Thalassemia;
• Other heamoglobinopathies.
Normocytic
• Acute blood loss;
• Haemolysis;
• BM failure;
• Anaemia of chronic disease;
• Renal failure.
 
Aetiology
Deficiency
• Iron;
• Vitamin B12;
• Folic acid;
• Pyridoxine;
Central (due to BM failure)
• Anaemia of chronic disease;
• Anaemia of senescence;
• Malignancy:
        – BM replacement by tumour;
        – Toxicity due to chemotherapy;
        – Primary BM malignancy, e.g., leukaemia.
Peripheral 
• Haemorrhage;
• Haemolysis.

a·ne·mi·a

(ă-nē'mē-ă)
Any condition in which the number of red blood cells per mm3, the amount of hemoglobin in 100 mL of blood, or the volume of packed red blood cells per 100 mL of blood is less than normal; clinically, generally pertaining to the concentration of oxygen-transporting material in a designated volume of blood. It is frequently manifested by pallor of the skin and mucous membranes, shortness of breath, palpitations of the heart, soft systolic murmurs, lethargy, and fatigability.
Synonym(s): anaemia.
[G. anaimia, fr. an- priv. + haima, blood]

anaemia

A reduction in the amount of HAEMOGLOBIN in the blood. There are several different kinds of anaemia including simple iron deficiency anaemia, haemolytic anaemia, pernicious anaemia, and aplastic anaemia.

anaemia

a deficiency in the number of red blood cells, or in their volume or haemoglobin content.

a·ne·mi·a

(ă-nē'mē-ă)
Any condition in whichthe number of red blood cells/mm3, the amount of hemoglobin in 100 mL of blood, and/or the volume of packed red blood cells/100 mL of blood are less than normal; frequently manifested by pallor of the skin and mucous membranes, shortness of breath, palpitations of the heart, soft systolic murmurs, lethargy, and tendency to fatigue.
Synonym(s): anaemia.
[G. anaimia, fr. an- priv. + haima, blood]

anaemia

see anemia.

Patient discussion about anaemia

Q. What is the Treatment for Anemia? I would like to know what are the possible treatments for anemia?

A. The first step in treating anemia, is discovering the cause for it. By a series of simple blood tests it is easy to discover iron defficiency, folic acid defficiency and vitamin B12 defficiency anemia, all which can be treated with oral supplements or a change of nutrition. Anemia that is associated with rectal bleeding should be further investigated, because it is often the first sign of colon polyps or colon cancer. Colonoscopy is then recommended.

Q. What are the Symptoms of Anemia? Lately I've been feeling very tired. My friend suggested I might be anemic. What are the major symptoms of anemia?

A. The symptoms of anemia vary according to the type of anemia, the underlying cause, and any underlying health problems. Anemia may be associated with other medical conditions such as hemorrhage, ulcers, menstrual problems or cancer -- and specific symptoms of those conditions may be noticed first.

The body also has a remarkable ability to compensate for early anemia. If your anemia is mild or developed over a long period of time, you may not notice any symptoms. Symptoms common to many types of anemia include the following:

Easy fatigue and loss of energy
Unusually rapid heart beat, particularly with exercise
Shortness of breath and headache, particularly with exercise
Difficulty concentrating
Dizziness
Pale skin
Leg cramps
Insomnia

Hope this helps.

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-anemia-symptoms

Q. What is the Definition of Anemia? My doctor told me I have anemia, based on my latest blood tests. What is anemia?

A. In laymans terms it is low iron. Most women get it sometime in their lives due to menstration and other factors. You need to increase your iron intake. Lots of beets, beans, spinich, and lots of other foods can help.

More discussions about anaemia
References in periodicals archive ?
Iron deficiency anaemia can be effectively prevented and in case already developed, can be easily treated by simple measures.
Global, regional, and national trends in haemoglobin concentration and prevalence of total and severe anaemia in children and pregnant and non-pregnant women for 1995-2011: a systematic analysis of population-representative data.
The distribution of anaemia, and effect of infection and treatment were assessed using descriptive statistics and graphical plots.
The 2011 EDHS data provides information on anaemia among under-five children and possible related factors in mothers and households.
Nutritional Deficiency Anaemia: The nutritional deficiency is the most common and preventable cause of anaemia.
Rationale and design of Ferinject assessment in patients with IRon deficiency and chronic Heart Failure (FAIR-HF) study: a randomized, placebo-controlled study of intravenous iron supplementation in patients with and without anaemia.
Anaemia was more common among patients with peripheral vascular disease, then congenital heart disease and congestive heart failure.
Anaemia among 157 patients with congestive cardiac failure (CCF) was studied by Kuule, Seremba and Freers.
Prevalence of anaemia in all the groups is higher in India as compared to other developing countries (1).
This low level of haemoglobin was responsible for the anaemia that Ridhi was suffering from.
Is anaemia a risk factor for delirium in acute geriatric populations?
Your pal, however, is right in saying it could be anaemia and the cabbage theory does make sense -but more of that later