anadiplosis


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Related to anadiplosis: Conduplicatio

anadiplosis

An obsolete term for a recurring febrile paroxysm.
References in periodicals archive ?
quae cum multa sint, ex omnibus necessaria fere sunt decem et septem, quorum haec sunt nomina: prolepsis, zeugma, hypozeuxis, syllepsis, anadiplosis, anaphora, epanalepsis, epizeuxis, paronomasia, schesis onomaton, parhomoeon, homoeoptoton.
However, if the reader sets aside the rather opportunistic claim that Hunt is a 'rococo' poet, and can see past the critical mannerisms (one is noting Hunt's use of the whole range of classical tropes from anadiplosis to zeugma), Edgecombe gives close and sensitive readings of many passages and poems which subsequent critics must take into account.
Yo agregaria otras figuras y recursos dentro del funcionamiento de la desintegracion textual: oximoros, similes, anaforas, aliteraciones, cataforas, elipsis, deixis, anadiplosis, pleonasmos, asindeton, polisindeton, etc.
Otros recursos frecuentes que huyen del prosaismo en favor de una expresion mas poetica son: las anadiplosis, repitiendo el ultimo periodo sintactico en el siguiente: ("soy un hada.
Though the nominal model is Xie Huilian, it shares the regular use of anadiplosis to join successive stanzas with Xie Lingyun's poem to Huilian, not Huilian's to Lingyun.
A climactic arrangement sometimes involves anadiplosis (the duplication of the terminal word or words of one line or clause at the beginning of the next):
19-23) and although it is not powerfully highlighted in any way, it is not a case of anadiplosis or reduplication that Joyce frequently exploits elsewhere in Dubliners (see the beginning of "Two Gallants", for instance).
The so rites was a series of enthymemes, or abridged syllogisms, taking the last word of a sentence or clause to begin the next, [8] the logical counterpart to the rhetorical anadiplosis.
Parish's study bristles with fearsome technical terms, such as isocolon and anadiplosis, and he provides a welcome glossary of these.
If an author is doing something subtle, like alliteration (repetition of consonants in adjacent words) or anadiplosis (repeating the last word of a clause at the beginning of the next clause; no, it's not a disease), be sensitive to it and try to help him get away with it, unless the audience will find it clearly inappropriate.
Thus, from Greek one finds pallilogia, anadiplosis, and epanalepsis; from Latin, geminatio, duplicatio, and iteratio.
Ring composition, or classical Latin inclusio and medieval emboitement, as the device is also known, resembles architectonically a host of other small-scale or local tropes, figures, and graphic or acoustic games: the palindrome, the boustrophedon or mirror-spelled word, anadiplosis, the stanzaic corona, hysteron proteron, and, most important, antimetabole.