anaclitic


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an·a·clit·ic

(an'ă-klit'ik),
Leaning or depending upon; in psychoanalysis, relating to the dependence of the infant on the mother or mother substitute. See: anaclitic depression.
[G. ana, toward, + klinō, to lean]

anaclitic

/ana·clit·ic/ (-klit´ik)
1. pertaining to anaclisis.
2. exhibiting excessive emotional dependency.

anaclitic

adjective In mental health, referring to the dependence of an infant on the mother or surrogate for a sense of well-being, which is normal in childhood but pathological if maintained in later years.

an·a·clit·ic

(an'ă-klit'ik)
Leaning or depending on; in psychoanalysis, relating to the dependence of the infant on the mother or mother substitute.
See: anaclitic depression
[G. ana, toward, + klinō, to lean]
References in periodicals archive ?
Smith takes a similar view of religious worship as an apparently anaclitic, but fundamentally narcissistic, practice in "Was He Married?
His own raw human strength, after all, far outshines the relatively unchallenged Jesus, with the effect that Man emerges as the more powerful figure, and this comparison has interesting implications for the gendered value of anaclitic desire.
Smith reveals the importance of childhood for her deconstruction of the binary between narcissistic and anaclitic desire in "Mother, Among the Dustbins" (Collected 118), a poem that stages a debate between a boy and his skeptical mother, with whom the poem invites us to sympathize.
The performance, in both highlighting and hiding the resemblance between white and black, reproduces the two ways of looking, narcissistic and anaclitic, that occur when one reads the play.
Since a particular form of white masculine identity, as I have suggested, structures itself in this very fluctuation between a narcissistic fascination with and an anaclitic fear of blackness, this identity is reinforced by the wavering that the spectator experiences between believing that the performance is an authentic reproduction of blackness and yet knowing that it is an artifact, a literary creation, and that it constitutes a production of whiteness; in this sense, the black body on stage is a "threat and a defense against this threat" (Lott 9).
8) Freud ("On Narcissism") distinguishes between two types of libidinal development in humans: anaclitic, wherein the subject seeks the object of love external to itself and which Freud characterizes as active and "masculine"; and narcissistic, wherein the subject seeks itself as love object and which Freud characterizes as passive and "feminine" (Chow 108).
When Wallace tells us what Hal is lonely 'for'--his internal sell the anaclitic infant--he contemplates the hero's reunion with the maternal 'thing'.
Bone's desire is cast by the normative system of heterosexuality in which female desire is constructed as narcissistic, rather than anaclitic, and in which the female reproduces herself as object of the gaze.
Such a masochistic turn marks the anaclitic sexualization of the instincts.
Everything that Freud relates about this first fantasy suggests that it represents a pre-sexual phase of development, that is, a phase before the anaclitic leaning of the drives upon the instincts and the accession into subjectivity.
As the final moment in the allegorical drama of identity constitution, it represents the anaclitic sexualization of the instincts through fantasmatization as a process that transforms the unstable polarities of activity and passivity into the reductive identities of masculine and feminine.