amylose


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amylose

 [am´ĭ-lōs]
1. any carbohydrate other than a glucose or saccharose.
2. the soluble constituent of starch, as opposed to amylopectin.

am·y·lose

(am'i-lōs),
An unbranched polyglucose (glucan) in starch, similar to cellulose, containing α(1→4) linkages. Compare: amylopectin.

amylose

/am·y·lose/ (am´ĭ-lōs) a linear, water-soluble glucan; the soluble constituent of starch, as opposed to amylopectin.

amylose

(ăm′ə-lōs′, -lōz′)
n.
A linear, unbranched polysaccharide that is one of the two main components, along with amylopectin, of starches.

amylose

a minor constituent of starch (20-30%), consisting of a linear chain of glucose molecules connected by linkages; it stains blue with iodine.

am·y·lose

(am'i-lōs)
An unbranched polyglucose (glucan) in starch, similar to cellulose, containing α(1→4) linkages.
Compare: amylopectin

amylose

a carbohydrate polymer composed of unbranched chains of GLUCOSE units. See STARCH.

amylose

1. polysaccharide of d-glucose containing α-1→4 glycosidic bonds.
2. the soluble constituent of starch, as opposed to amylopectin.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the presence of flavor compounds, amylose changes from a double helix to a single helix.
The objective of the project is to prepare three batches of rice reference materials having amylose contents about 15 %, 20 % (critical value in the above Regulation), and 25 %.
During experiments on starch fibers, the researchers successfully used an extended range of amylose concentrations from 25 to 100 percent.
Studies suggest that the apparent amylose content of Chokuwa could be as low as 15 to 20 per cent and even lesser in Bora.
had much increased water solubility compared to the nAYBS, presumably due to depolymerization of both amylose nd amylopectin and structural weakening of the starch granule as a whole.
shimeji grew rapidly on both starch and amylose medium.
It contains two different starches: an amylopectin exterior, which softens faster--especially under the pressure of constant stirring--to create a creamy sensation in the mouth; and an amylose interior, which stays relatively firm during cooking to give you that al dente bite.
Topics of the other nine chapters include microalgae in novel food products, the ochratoxin A concentration in wines, the role of amylose and amylopectin in starchy foods, protein and lipid recovery from food processing by-products, and the gelation of high methoxy pectins.
Class (DP) Subgroup Components Sugars (1-2) Monosaccharides Glucose, galactose, fructose Disaccharides Sucrose, lactose, trehalose Polyols Lactitol, xylitol, sorbitol, mannitol Oligosaccharides Malto-oligosaccharides Maltodextrins (3-9) Other oligosaccharides Raffinose, stachyose, fructo- oligosaccharides Polysaccharides (>9) Starch Amylose, amylopectin, modified starches Non-starch Cellulose, polysaccharides hemicelluloses, polydextrose, pectins, hydrocolloids
Gelatinized starch is, in essence, an amylose gel network with the swollen granules as filler [11].
Factors contributing to decreased digestibility include: 1) increased dietary fiber intake; 2) intact cell walls which hinder penetration of the digestive enzymes to access the starch and protein; 3) residual lectin activity; 4) limited proteolysis of certain proteins; 5) incomplete hydration of the starch granule; and 6) amylose retrogradation.
The amylose content is minimal so that it can provide a dough property specific to the wavy wheat.